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Lateran Councils

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Albert Behaim

Albert Behaim  

(c.1180–c.1260) German cleric, born and educated near Niederaltaich, Bavaria;*canon in Passau from 1212; went to Rome for the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215, remaining there in a diplomatic post. ...
Alexander II, Pope

Alexander II, Pope  

(c.1010/1015–1073)Anselmo da Baggio, the son of a leading Milanese family, was educated from his youth at Milan cathedral. In 1056, thanks to the support of the Emperor Henry III ...
Alexander III

Alexander III  

(d. 1181), Pope from 1159. After his election, an antipope (Victor IV) was immediately set up and supported by the Emp. Frederick I. During the 17-year schism, Alexander lived mainly in France. Here ...
badge, Jewish

badge, Jewish  

Concern to segregate Christendom’s Jewish minority intensified over the MA. The most demeaning technique was to require distinguishing external garb to identify Jews as ‘different’. Such a demand was ...
banns of marriage

banns of marriage  

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Overview Page
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History
The custom of announcing a forthcoming marriage during Divine Service seems to have been developed in the early Middle Ages to prevent consanguinity. Under the Marriage Act 1949, banns must be ...
Barsumas

Barsumas  

(d. c.457),archimandrite and saint of the Syrian Orthodox Church. He was invited by the Emp. Theodosius II (d. 450) to defend Eutyches at the Second Council of Ephesus (Latrocinium ...
Benedictine

Benedictine  

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History
A monk or nun of an order following the rule of St Benedict. From the original Benedictine foundations at Subiaco and Monte Cassino in Italy the number of monastic houses in Europe grew to many ...
Brixworth

Brixworth  

Church in Northamptonshire is the most impressive church to survive from Anglo-Saxon England. Built from reused brick and tile pillaged from Roman Leicester, its earliest parts probably date to the ...
canon law

canon law  

The body of rules or laws developing gradually, imposed by church authority in matters of its own organization and discipline (extending also to matters of belief).
casuistry

casuistry  

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History
n.1. an approach to ethical analysis that is based on cases as distinct from principle-dependent or rule-based methods of evaluating moral problems. 2. an excessively subtle or opaque form of ...
collections, canonical

collections, canonical  

Ecclesiastical legislative texts organized chronologically or systematically. They could include genuine or apocryphal, authentic (officially promulgated) or private, and general or particular ...
Conflicts of Jurisdiction

Conflicts of Jurisdiction  

Conflicts could arise betwen secular jurisdictions of a different order or competence. They were also encountered in ecclesiastical society by reason of the parties in dispute or the nature of ...
continence

continence  

In the broad sense, the object of continence is temperance in the sphere of the search for nourishment and the desires of the flesh. Its seat is in the will ...
council

council  

A formal meeting of bishops and representatives of several Churches convened for the purpose of regulating doctrine or discipline. General or Oecumenical Councils are assemblies of bishops ...
Council of Hertford

Council of Hertford  

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History
(672 or 673). A Council of bishops held under Theodore, Abp. of Canterbury, to promote the reorganization of the English Church. It issued ten canons, concerned especially with the rights and duties ...
Councils of Lyon

Councils of Lyon  

Ecumenical councils, convoked in 1245 by Pope Innocent IV and in 1274 by Gregory X. Their main decisions concerned crusade, especially the taxation of the clergy to help the Latin ...
Dionysius the Pseudo-Areopagite

Dionysius the Pseudo-Areopagite  

(c.500), mystical theologian. The name given to the author of a body of theological writings to which the supporters of Severus, Patr. of Antioch, appealed in 533, attributing them to Dionysius (1) ...
Easter

Easter  

The most important and oldest festival of the Christian Church, celebrating the resurrection of Christ and held (in the Western Church) between 21 March and 25 April, on the first Sunday after the ...
Election

Election  

Election, from the Latin term eligere, “to choose”, was the procedure of designating the titular of certain major ecclesiastical posts or Benefices.Electio, in the medieval Church, was distinguished ...
English Parliament

English Parliament  

The word parliamentum is found from the 1240s onwards as a technical term in official records of the exchequer, chancery and law courts. There is however a difference of opinion ...

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