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Agnes of Bohemia

Agnes of Bohemia  

Foundress and first abbess of the Franciscan (poor Clare) nuns (d. c.1282). A descendant of Duke Wenceslaus, daughter of Ottokar I king of Bohemia and his Hungarian royal wife, Agnes from early ...
Alexis, Legend of Saint

Alexis, Legend of Saint  

The starting-point for the legend of St Alexis was probably the existence at Edessa, around the 5th c., of an ascetic famous for his extreme poverty and humility. Starting from ...
Amalfi

Amalfi  

A small Italian city in Campania, clinging to the rocky slopes of its peninsula dominating the bay of Salerno, Amalfi is mentioned as a bishopric in a letter of Pope ...
Antonines

Antonines  

The Hospitaller Order of St Anthony in Viennois (Isère) arose in c.1095. At this time there appeared in Europe a sickness called ignis sacer by reason of the burning pains ...
architecture, Ecclesiastical

architecture, Ecclesiastical  

Ecclesiastical architecture responds, from a purely practical point of view, primarily to the requirements of worship and secondarily to the needs of those who dedicate themselves to the religious ...
Autun

Autun  

Founded by Augustus (hence Augustodunum), this fortified centre of Burgundian trade, church history, and rhetoric still has Roman remains. Its outstanding architectural monument is the 12th-century ...
Bergen

Bergen  

Norwegian town. Bergen probably became a bishop’s seat and a legally confirmed urban community in the reign of King Olaf III Haraldsson (1067–93). The town grew into the all-important export ...
Cambrai

Cambrai  

A politically valuable frontier town, Cambrai was near the French, Flemish, and German borders, with bishops dominant from the 10th century. Cambrai was a centre of cloth production in the ...
Dole

Dole  

Situated in the county of Burgundy, Dole does not appear in history until the late 11th c., in the form of a comital castle controlling a crossing of the Doubs ...
Euageis Oikoi

Euageis Oikoi  

(εὑαγει̑ς οἰ̑κοι), a category of pious institutions, also called theioi or divine. Probably in the 6th C., the previous philanthropic organizations (see Philanthropy) created by Christians to assist ...
Federico Visconti

Federico Visconti  

(died 1277)Offspring of a great Pisan family that provided several podestàs, Federico must have studied at Pisa, continuing at Bologna (where he was in 1222) and then at Paris. ...
Filles-Dieu

Filles-Dieu  

This name was given to women brought into semi-religious communities by clerics or laymen, who appeared in the northern half of France around 1230. There is no doubt that some ...
Franciscans

Franciscans  

Christian religious orders derived from St Francis and St Clare of Assisi. Basic to them is the initial determination of Francis that they should be brothers and sisters ‘living according to the form ...
Gerokomeion

Gerokomeion  

(γηροκομει̑ον), or gerotropheion, home for the destitute elderly, under the direction of a gerokomos. As part of their tradition of philanthropy, the Byz. built special homes for elderly people who ...
Hospital

Hospital   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
276 words

(ξενών, νοσοκομει̑ον). One of the early Christian customs that impressed pagans was the care of the infirm, ill, and the

Hospital, Hospice

Hospital, Hospice   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
1,345 words
Illustration(s):
1

The first hospital establishments in the West go back to the Frankish period: their existence is attested then in numerous

Jewish Quarter

Jewish Quarter  

A topographical space (one or several streets) in the medieval town that housed a Jewish population, provided with communal facilities indispensable for religious practice (synagogue, school, mikvé ...
leper-house, -hospital

leper-house, -hospital  

Replacing maladerie, which designated any hospice for the sick, the Old French term maladrerie, formed around 1160 at the earliest, by attraction of the word ladre (lazar, leper), remained rare ...
Lips Monastery

Lips Monastery  

(Fenari Isa Camii), founded in the Lycus valley in the western part of Constantinople probably by Constantine Lips; it is traditionally believed to have been inaugurated in June 907. Whether ...
Malmesbury

Malmesbury  

Malmesbury is a small town in Wiltshire: it was a borough with municipal franchises, but it owed its importance to the presence of a Benedictine abbey the 24th richest in ...

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