Overview

homeostasis

Return to overview »

You are looking at 1-17 of 17 entries  for:

  • Medicine and health x
clear all

View:

acid–base homeostasis

acid–base homeostasis  

Reference type:
Overview Page
All living things depend on water. Life consists of a highly complex series of chemical reactions occurring in aqueous media. Among the most important factors in the composition of these ...
adjustment

adjustment  

Change or adaptation within a system that serves to accommodate the factor(s) that are promoting the change and produce a new equilibrium. A system changes when it is forced to, otherwise it tends to ...
autonomic nervous system

autonomic nervous system  

Reference type:
Overview Page
That part of the nervous system that controls and regulates involuntary body functions (e.g. digestion, heart rate, and temperature regulation). It is divided up into the sympathetic and ...
body fluids

body fluids  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A term that includes blood, tears, sweat, serous and mucous secretions from all bodily orifices, saliva, urine, and semen. In clinical usage, the term refers to body fluids that can transmit ...
breathing

breathing  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(breeth-ing)the alternation of active inhalation of air into the lungs through the mouth or nose with the passive exhalation of the air. Breathing is part of respiration and is sometimes called ...
calcium

calcium  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(kal-siŭm)a metallic element that is an important constituent of bones, teeth, and blood. It is also essential for many metabolic processes, including nerve function, muscle contraction, and blood ...
excretion

excretion  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The natural removal of metabolic waste products, water, mineral salts, and carbon dioxide from the body. It occurs through the kidneys, lungs, and sweat glands.
glia

glia  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(neuroglia) n. the special connective tissue of the central nervous system, composed of different cells, including the oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, ependymal cells (see ependyma), and microglia, ...
homeostasis

homeostasis   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science & Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
The ability or tendency to maintain a constant physical or chemical state within a system using compensatory control mechanisms. Physiological homeostasis is illustrated by the maintenance ... More
insulin

insulin  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A hormone produced in the pancreas. It controls the levels of sugar in the blood. Diabetes mellitus is the production of too little or no insulin.
kidney

kidney  

Reference type:
Overview Page
An organ that may have arisen in freshwater animals for the purpose of voiding excess water and that is concerned in modern forms with excretion and/or the retention of water.
liver

liver  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The largest organ of the body, located in the upper right part of the abdominal cavity under the lowest ribs of the thorax (right hypochondrium). It has many functions, including secreting bile, ...
medulla oblongata

medulla oblongata  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(myelencephalon) the extension within the skull of the upper end of the spinal cord, forming the lowest part of the brainstem. Besides forming the major pathway for nerve impulses entering and ...
norm

norm  

1 The set point or reference point in a system that has its output maintained at a constant level. For example, the norm for body core temperature is approximately 37 °C. See also homeostasis.2 An ...
physiology

physiology  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The branch of biology concerned with the vital functions of plants and animals, such as nutrition, respiration, reproduction, and excretion.
stressor

stressor  

An internal or external factor that makes demands on an individual and tends to disrupt homeostasis. Stressors include physical trauma, disease, social events and situations, and the demands of ...
ventilatory buffering

ventilatory buffering  

A homeostatic mechanism (see homeostasis) involving changes in ventilation that help to maintain the acid-base balance in body fluids. Ventilatory buffering is particularly important during exercise ...

View: