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Sigmund Freud

(1856—1939) founder of psychoanalysis

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anaesthesia

anaesthesia  

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Strictly, the loss of feeling, but generally used for the techniques of pain relief using anaesthetics prior to surgery.
behaviour therapy

behaviour therapy  

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(bi-hayv-yer)treatment based on the belief that psychological problems are the products of faulty learning and not the symptoms of an underlying disease. See also aversion therapy, conditioning, ...
bereavement

bereavement  

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Loss of a relative or friend through death; the grief reaction that often follows such a loss. [From Old English bereafian to plunder]
degeneration

degeneration  

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n. the deterioration and loss of specialized function of the cells of a tissue or organ. The changes may be caused by a defective blood supply or by disease. Degeneration may involve the deposition ...
hypnotism

hypnotism  

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An obsolescent name for the state of hypnosis.
hysteria

hysteria  

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n. 1. formerly, a neurosis characterized by emotional instability, repression, dissociation, some physical symptoms (see hysterical), and vulnerability to suggestion. Two types were recognized: ...
infancy

infancy  

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In lay usage, an imprecisely defined period from birth to the age when a child is toilet trained and/or can feed, dress, and wash without the help of a parent or older sibling. Statistically the term ...
internalization

internalization  

1 The acceptance and incorporation of the beliefs or standards of others. For example, internalization occurs when individual team members adopt the mores of the team in which they play. Compare ...
libido

libido  

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n.1. (in psychoanalytic theory) the life instinct or, specifically, the sexual instinct. The libido (like the death instinct) is said to be one of the fundamental sources of energy for all mental ...
neurosis

neurosis  

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An emotional maladjustment with the predominant symptom of anxiety together with possible impairment of thinking or judgement. It may be characterized by phobias, obsessions, compulsions, or sexual ...
paranoia

paranoia  

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n.1. a mental illness or a symptom of a mental illness characterized by delusions, sometimes organized into a system. Antipsychotic medication is often beneficial. 2. a state of mind in which the ...
patients, notable

patients, notable  

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A tiny number of individuals have a claim to historical immortality solely because of their medical conditions. The name of James Phipps would be entirely forgotten but for the fact ...
personality

personality  

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n. (in psychology) an enduring disposition to act and feel in particular ways that differentiate one individual from another. These patterns of behaviour are sometimes conceptualized as different ...
psychiatry

psychiatry  

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n. the study of mental disorders and their diagnosis, management, and prevention. —psychiatric adj.
rejuvenation

rejuvenation  

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For almost all of recorded history, human beings seem to have searched for ways to prolong their lives and augment the vitality of the aged — effects which, for the ...
statues

statues  

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For much of history societies have honored special persons or commemorated events by raising statues or building monuments. Statues of famous personages were erected in ancient Egypt, Greece, and ...
sublimation

sublimation  

(sub-li-may-shŏn)the replacement of socially undesirable means of gratifying motives or desires by means that are socially acceptable. See also defence mechanism, repression.
taboo

taboo  

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A social or religious custom prohibiting or restricting a particular practice or forbidding association with a particular person, place, or thing. The word comes (in the late 18th century) from ...

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