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aback

aback  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The situation of the sails of a square-rigged ship when the yards are trimmed to bring the wind to bear on their forward side. Sails are laid aback purposely to stop a ship's way through the water or ...
anchor

anchor  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Figuratively, a source of security and confidence. An anchor in Christian tradition is a symbol of hope, from a passage in Hebrews 6:19; it is also the emblem of St Clement, who was martyred by being ...
barnacle

barnacle  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A small crustacean that occurs in vast numbers attached to rocks, jetties, piers, etc., and on the hulls of ships and boats. The commonest on the shore are acorn barnacles (Balanus spp.), which live ...
breaming

breaming  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
In the early days of sail, the method of cleaning the fouling off a ship's bottom by careening, and then burning off the seaweed, barnacles, etc., which had grown there through long immersion. The ...
copper sheathing

copper sheathing  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The process of protecting the hull of a wooden ship with thin sheets of copper. It prevents the teredo worm eating into the planks, and inhibits seaweed and barnacles from building up on the ship's ...
foul

foul  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
An adjective and a verb with various nautical meanings, generally indicative of something wrong or difficult. When used as an adjective a foul hawse is the expression used when a ship lying to two ...
fouling

fouling   Quick reference

M. V. Angel

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
321 words

Any surface placed in the ocean soon gains a cover of bacteria, algae and seaweeds, and animals such as barnacles...

Fouling

Fouling   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Military History
Length:
1,839 words

Wooden and iron ships, in temperate and especially in tropical waters, provide a convenient attachment point for a wide variety

hog

hog  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
1 A device from the days of sail for cleaning the fouling off a ship's bottom when it was not copper sheathed. It was formed by enclosing a number of birch twigs between two planks, binding them ...
International Maritime Organization

International Maritime Organization  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
(IMO),a special agency of the United Nations established in 1958 with responsibility for improving maritime safety and preventing pollution from ships. It has its headquarters on the Albert ...
shipbuilding

shipbuilding  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Transport over water is a necessity in most parts of the world. Since time immemorial ships have been constructed in any place with a suitable shoreline, easily procured supplies of timber, and an ...
Shipworm

Shipworm  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Shipworms were one of the greatest forces controlling the history of global shipping, regulating the evolution, survival, and routes of wooden ships for thousands of years. The destruction of ships ...
teredo

teredo  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A bivalve mollusc, of the family Teredinidae, also known as a shipworm because of the damage they cause to any wood in the sea. They bore long cylindrical holes in the wood, digesting the wood they ...
timenoguy

timenoguy  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
(pron. and sometimes written, timonoggy), originally a rope stretched taut between different parts of a square-rigger to prevent one of the tacks or braces from fouling some projection. This applied ...

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