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compass

compass   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
55 words

in present parlance the instrument by means of which a ship may be steered on a course and by means of which ...

compass

compass   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Renaissance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)
Length:
121 words
The simplest form of compass was a magnetized needle lodged in a straw or piece of cork and floating in a basin of water. From the twelfth century compass needles were placed on a pivot ... More
compass, magnetic and mariner’s

compass, magnetic and mariner’s   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
222 words

The earliest written evidence of a magnetized needle used to find direction comes from China c.ad 1040.

con, cond

con, cond  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
From the Anglo-Saxon connan, to know, to be skilful, or possibly from the Latin conducere, to lead or conduct, the giving of the necessary orders to the helmsman to steer a ship in a required ...
fly

fly  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
1 The old maritime word for the compass card from the time it was pivoted in the compass bowl and thus able to revolve freely.2 The part of a flag, ensign, or pennant furthest from the jackstaff or ...
head

head  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A much used maritime word meaning the top or forward part. The top edge of a four-sided sail is the head, the top of the mast is the masthead, the head of a ship is the bows (but the ship's head ...
navigation

navigation  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
N.1 the process or activity of accurately ascertaining one's position and planning and following a route.2 the passage of ships.navigational adj.n.1 the process or activity ...
pelorus

pelorus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A circular ring fitted to the rim of a compass bowl and carrying two sighting vanes, used to take azimuths of celestial objects. The ring can be easily revolved and the compass bearing read off by ...
Petrus Peregrinus of Maricourt

Petrus Peregrinus of Maricourt  

(fl. 13th century)A physician and possibly crusader in the service of Charles I of Anjou, who dabbled with perpetual motion using magnetism, which led him to investigate the properties ...
signals at sea

signals at sea  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Can be broadly divided historically into day signals, night signals, wireless telegraphy, and modern radio communications, and a brief history of the development of each can be found below.Day ...
to shoot

to shoot  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A verb with more than one nautical meaning. A navigator is said to shoot the sun, or any heavenly body, when he takes its altitude with a sextant. A sailing vessel is said to shoot, or fore-reach, ...
travel and mobility

travel and mobility  

Travel and mobility were vital dimensions to life during the MA. By the central MA, diplomats, merchants, military and mendicant orders, and Jewish communities had established networks linking their ...

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