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Basil, St, ‘the Great’

(c. 330—379)

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Apodeipnon

Apodeipnon  

(ἀπόδειπνον, lit. “after supper”), compline, the liturgical hour that completes the monastic day with prayer for a tranquil night free from sin and evil dreams. First seen in the Longer ...
Armenian literature

Armenian literature  

Armenian literature begins with the invention of an individual script by Mesrop Mas̆tocʼ (c.360–439). Although familiar with Greek and Syriac, Armenian church leaders needed a written form of ...
Basil Elachistos

Basil Elachistos  

(“the least”), archbishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia (mid-10th C.); according to R. Cantarella (BZ 25 [1925] 293), he was born in Seleukeia.Basil wrote a commentary on the speeches of ...
Caesarea

Caesarea  

(Καισάρεια, mod. Kayseri), metropolis of Cappadocia. When its enthusiastic Christians destroyed pagan temples, Emp. Julian deprived Caesarea of municipal status, but it soon recovered to flourish ...
Diodoros

Diodoros  

(Διόδωρος), bishop of Tarsos (from 378) and theologian; born Antioch, died before 394.Educated at Athens, Diodoros became a monk and then hegoumenos of a monastery outside of Antioch. He ...
Fathers of the Church

Fathers of the Church  

The early Christian writers, a term usually applied to those of the first five centuries. Sometimes the Greek and Latin fathers are distinguished, the former including Clement of Alexandria, Origen, ...
florilegium

florilegium  

A collection of passages from the writings of previous authors. Special interest attaches to the Greek patristic florilegia. Besides those composed of excerpts from commentaries on the Bible (known ...
Forty Martyrs of Sebaste

Forty Martyrs of Sebaste  

(d. 320).These soldiers of the ‘thundering Legion’ were the victims of a persecution by the Emperor Licinius, which required repudiation of Christianity under pain of death. The local governor of ...
Fronto Ducaeus

Fronto Ducaeus  

(1559–1624),French patristic scholar. He entered the Jesuit Order in 1577 and in 1604 was appointed librarian of the College of Clermont in Paris. He specialized in the editing of ...
Hagiographical Illustration

Hagiographical Illustration  

The primary focus of Byz. hagiographical (see Hagiography) illustration was portraiture: the particular deeds of individual saints played a comparatively minor role in all but the very earliest ...
hermit

hermit  

A person living in solitude as a religious discipline; the word is recorded from Middle English, and comes via Old French and late Latin, from Greek erēmitēs, from erēmos ‘solitary’.
Hexaemeron

Hexaemeron  

The account of the creation of the universe in six days in Gen. 1; also patristic commentaries on this narrative.
Hrotsvitha of Gandersheim

Hrotsvitha of Gandersheim  

(c.935–c.1002)First known woman poet of the MA and first known author of dramas since antiquity. She wrote eight saints’ legends in rhymed verse, eight dramas mainly in prose, and ...
image

image  

1 The representation of an object that is produced when electromagnetic radiation passes through it or is reflected from it. Visible images are formed when light impinges on the retina, and various ...
incest

incest  

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The criminal offence of an act of penetration (penetrating or allowing to be penetrated) between close family members, which generally includes a lineal ancestor, lineal descendant, sibling or ...
intellect

intellect  

"Intellect", intellectus, means firstly the content of the operation of knowledge and then the supreme faculty or power of knowledge in man. The meaning of faculty and that of object ...
Mamas

Mamas  

(Μάμας), saint; feastday 2 Sept.The earliest panegyrics by Basil the Great (PG 31:589–600) and Gregory of Nazianzos (PG 36:620f) are devoid of factual information: they only call Mamas a ...
novice

novice  

A person in a period of probation in a religous house before pronouncing his or her vows. At the end of the noviciate, the postulant had the choice of returning ...
nunnery

nunnery  

In the early Anglo‐Saxon period, monastic life for women was almost always in double houses, of which Theodore disapproved. In most of these, monks and nuns shared a church, though at Wimborne ...
Philokalia

Philokalia  

(Φιλοκαλία, lit. “love for the good” [in Church Slavonic translated as dobrotoljubie]). A term for property improvement (in documents) or for scholarly correction (e.g., Epiphanios of Salamis, [PG ...

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