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Alexander the Great

(356—323 bc) king of Macedon 336–323

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Alexander

Alexander 1   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

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2006
(356–323 bc), king of Macedon 336–323, son of Philip II; known as Alexander the Great. He conquered Persia, Egypt, Syria, Mesopotamia, Bactria, and the Punjab; in Egypt he ... More
Alexander Romances

Alexander Romances  

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Literature
Generic term for the large group of enormously popular narrative poems, mainly in French and with a rich iconographic tradition, devoted to the life of Alexander the Great. Deriving initially ...
Alexandria

Alexandria  

The chief port and second‐largest city of Egypt, on the Mediterranean coast, northwest of Cairo. Founded in 332 bc by Alexander the Great, after whom it is named, it became a major centre of ...
alexandrine

alexandrine  

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Literature
An iambic line of twelve syllables or six feet. The term comes (in the late 16th century) from French, from Alexandre (see Alexander1), the subject of an Old French poem in this metre.
Cleopatra

Cleopatra  

(69–30bc),queen of Egypt from 47 bc, the last Ptolemaic ruler. After a brief liaison with Julius Caesar she formed a political and romantic alliance with Mark Antony. Their ambitions ultimately ...
Egypt

Egypt  

Pre‐PtolemaicDuring the New Kingdom (Dynasties 18–20, c.1575–1087bc) Egypt expanded into Asia. This great age of Egyptian militarism created in the 18th Dynasty an empire which stretched from the ...
elephants

elephants  

The elephant is the largest living land animal, and is taken as a type of something of great size and weight. The Indian elephant was traditionally used as a beast of burden and in the ancient world ...
epic

epic  

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A long poem, typically one derived from ancient oral tradition, narrating the deeds and adventures of heroic or legendary figures or the past history of a nation. The word comes via Latin from Greek ...
gems

gems  

Minerals (usually of crystallized matter) used for decorating items such as textiles and liturgical objects or for personal adornment. The most highly prized are the precious stones, diamonds, ...
Hellenism

Hellenism  

Of or relating to Greek history, language, and culture from the death of Alexander the Great to the defeat of Cleopatra and Mark Antony by Octavian in 31 bc. During this period Greek culture ...
Henry Brooke

Henry Brooke  

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Literature
(1703–83)Writer and playwright, educated in Dublin. He read law at the Temple in London, and returned in 1740 to Dublin, where he then chiefly lived. While in London he ...
hunting

hunting  

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Literature
Epic heroes (see homer) hunt to fill their bellies or to rid the land of dangerous beasts. The boar is the most formidable antagonist; venison is highly valued; mentions of lions are problematic. ...
matter

matter  

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Literature
A term derived from French matière, sometimes used by modern scholars to refer to medieval romances. It has its origins in the work of Jean Bodel (late 12th–early 13th century) ...
Nine Worthies

Nine Worthies  

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‘Three Paynims, three Jews, and three Christian men’, namely Hector of Troy, Alexander the Great, and Julius Caesar; Joshua, David, and Judas Maccabaeus; Arthur, Charlemagne, and Godefroi de Bouillon ...
nomads

nomads  

[Ge]Herding societies whose seasonal movements are primarily dependent on the search for fresh pastures, although exceptionally they may also be involved with limited cultivation.
Perceforest

Perceforest  

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Literature
A vast French prose romance of the 14th cent., in which the author seeks to link the legends of Alexander and Arthur. Alexander, after the conquest of India, is driven by a storm on the coast of ...
Secreta Secretorum

Secreta Secretorum  

A compendium of pronouncements on political and ethical matters. Written in Syriac in the 8th cent. ad and claiming to be advice from Aristotle to Alexander. It reached Europe through Arabic and ...
Seleucids

Seleucids  

A member of a dynasty ruling over Syria and a great part of western Asia from 311 to 65 bc. Its capital was at Antioch. The name comes from Seleucus Nicator (the founder, one of Alexander the Great's ...
Smyrna

Smyrna  

A city of Roman Asia, now Izmir, on the W. coast of Turkey. The Christian community was one of the ‘Seven Churches’ addressed in Rev. (2: 8–11); it was warned of coming persecution. St Polycarp was ...

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