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Alexander the Great

(356—323 bc) king of Macedon 336–323

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Abydos

Abydos  

1 A town of ancient Mysia in Asia Minor, situated on a hill overlooking the Dardanelles, north‐east of the modern Turkish city of Çanakkale. Abydos was the scene of the story of Hero and Leander and ...
Alexander the Great

Alexander the Great   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
294 words

(Alexander III of Macedon), son of Philip II of Macedon and Olympias; born 356 b.c., died 323. Alexander

Amphipolis

Amphipolis  

On the east bank of the Strӯmōn, which surrounds the city on three sides (hence its name), 5 km. (3 mi.) from its seaport Eïon; it was originally the site of a Thracian town, Ennea Hodoi (‘nine ...
Arabs

Arabs  

Ancient tribes and peoples who lived in, and around the modern Arabian peninsula. Herodotus was acquainted with the Arabs of southern Palestine and the Sinai, and mentions the Arabs of the incense ...
Cappadocia

Cappadocia  

An ancient region of central Asia Minor, between Lake Tuz and the Euphrates, north of Cilicia. It was an important centre of early Christianity.
Cilicia

Cilicia  

A Roman province, in SE Asia Minor. Tarsus, birthplace of Paul (Acts 22: 3) was one of its towns. Paul twice passed through the area (Acts 15: 40–41 and 18: 23).
Digenes Akritas

Digenes Akritas  

(Διγενής ᾽Ακρίτας), epic-romance in political verse compiled, perhaps in the 12th C., from earlier material, much of which may originally derive from oral sources (see Poetry, Oral).The text falls ...
Gaza

Gaza  

A city in the hands in turn of the tribe of Judah (Judg. 1: 18), the Philistines (1 Sam. 6: 17), the Assyrians, Judah under Hezekiah (2 Kgs. 18: 8), the Egyptians (609 bce), and the Seleucids. It was ...
geography

geography  

The study of the Earth's surface and of the ways in which people, plants, and animals live on and use it.
Hellespont

Hellespont  

The ancient name for the Dardanelles, named after the legendary Helle, who fell into the strait and was drowned while escaping with her brother Phrixus from their stepmother, Ino, on a golden-fleeced ...
Jaffa

Jaffa  

Mediterranean port city of Canaanite origin, conquered by Muslims in 638; eventually a Fatimid caliphate dependency. Under the crusaders after 1126, it was claimed by the church but became a ...
Jew

Jew  

A member of the people and cultural community whose traditional religion is Judaism and who trace their origins to the ancient Hebrew people of Israel.The name is Middle English and comes via Old ...
koinē

koinē  

The form of Greek (koine = common) which was the international language after the death of Alexander the Great (323 bce) both in cities of Greece and throughout the Hellenistic world. It is a ...
seal

seal  

A piece of wax, lead, or other material with an individual design stamped into it, attached to a document to show that it has come from the person who claims to have issued it. Recorded from Middle ...
urbanism

urbanism  

[De]A term used by Louis Wirth to denote distinctive characteristics of urban social life, such as its impersonality, but more recently expanded to encompass physical features of urban existence such ...

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