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Alexander the Great

(356—323 bc) king of Macedon 336–323

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Alexander the Great

Alexander the Great   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Classical Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Classical studies
Length:
681 words

King of Macedon (b Pella, Macedonia, 356 bc; reg 336–323bc; d Babylon, 10 June

Alexandria

Alexandria  

The chief port and second‐largest city of Egypt, on the Mediterranean coast, northwest of Cairo. Founded in 332 bc by Alexander the Great, after whom it is named, it became a major centre of ...
Amathus

Amathus  

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A major coastal city of Cyprus, on a hill near mod. Ayios Tychonas, 10 km. (6 mi.) east of Limassol, surrounded by extensive and much excavated cemeteries, and immediately adjacent ...
Antenor

Antenor  

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Athenian sculptor active in the late 6th century bc. In antiquity he was famous for his bronze group of the Tyrannicides (c.510 bc, now lost), which stood in the agora ...
Apelles

Apelles  

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(4th century bc),Greek painter. He is now known only from written sources, as by Pliny's account of his Venus Anadyomene, but was highly acclaimed throughout the ancient world.
Ara Pacis

Ara Pacis  

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A monumental altar erected in the northern Campus Martius near the via Lata, one of the major products of Augustan public art. It was voted in 13 bc by the senate, as Augustus records in his Res ...
Aspendus

Aspendus  

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A city in Pamphylia whose inhabitants claimed kinship with the Argives (see Hellenism; Argos (2)). Linguistic evidence shows that most of the inhabitants were of Anatolian origin (see Anatolian ...
cameo

cameo  

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Small-scale sculpture in which the design stands in relief above the surface. It is the opposite of intaglio. Often, the term refers specifically to a portrait cut in a gemstone; this form was highly ...
Central Asia

Central Asia  

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Landlocked region of the Asian land mass. Largely through its location, topography and hydrology, it has served for millennia as the carrier of human communications between the societies and ...
Cleopatra

Cleopatra  

(69–30bc),queen of Egypt from 47 bc, the last Ptolemaic ruler. After a brief liaison with Julius Caesar she formed a political and romantic alliance with Mark Antony. Their ambitions ultimately ...
Didyma

Didyma  

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An ancient sanctuary of Apollo, site of one of the most famous oracles of the Aegean region, close to the west coast of Asia Minor; the name is said to come from Greek ‘twin’, and to refer to the two ...
Egypt

Egypt  

Pre‐PtolemaicDuring the New Kingdom (Dynasties 18–20, c.1575–1087bc) Egypt expanded into Asia. This great age of Egyptian militarism created in the 18th Dynasty an empire which stretched from the ...
elephants

elephants  

The elephant is the largest living land animal, and is taken as a type of something of great size and weight. The Indian elephant was traditionally used as a beast of burden and in the ancient world ...
Euphranor

Euphranor  

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Greek sculptor and painter, active c. 370–330 bc. Only his colossal marble Apollo Patrous has survived. A virtuoso all-rounder, he also made personifications (Aretē, Hellas, i.e. Virtue and Greece), ...
gems

gems  

Minerals (usually of crystallized matter) used for decorating items such as textiles and liturgical objects or for personal adornment. The most highly prized are the precious stones, diamonds, ...
Hellenism

Hellenism  

Of or relating to Greek history, language, and culture from the death of Alexander the Great to the defeat of Cleopatra and Mark Antony by Octavian in 31 bc. During this period Greek culture ...
Ionia

Ionia  

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In classical times, the central part of the west coast of Asia Minor, which had long been inhabited by Hellenic people (the Ionians) and was again colonized by Greeks from the mainland from about the ...
Leochares

Leochares  

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Greek (probably Athenian) sculptor active in the mid-4th century bc. He is recorded in several ancient sources but is an elusive figure. In about 350 bc he is thought to have worked with Scopas and ...
Louis-François Roubiliac

Louis-François Roubiliac  

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(b Lyons, 31 Aug. 1702; d London, 11 Jan. 1762).French-born sculptor, active in England for virtually his entire career. Little is known of his life before he settled in London in 1730, although he ...
Lycia

Lycia  

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Was a mountainous country in SW Asia Minor between Caria and Pamphylia. According to Herodotus (1. 173) the Lycians came there direct from Crete under Sarpedon and at that time ...

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