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Abbey

Abbey   Reference library

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Religion
Length:
16 words

Building or buildings used (or once used) by a religious order of monks or nuns.

abbey

abbey   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Local and Family History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
42 words

A major monastery, ruled over by an abbot. The Cistercian and Premonstratensian foundations were abbeys, whereas the Cluniac and Carthusian

abbey

abbey   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Local and Family History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
67 words

A major monastery, ruled over by an abbot. The Cistercian and Premonstratensian foundations were abbeys, whereas the Cluniac and Carthusian...

abbey

abbey   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
80 words
The buildings occupied by a religious community, partially or wholly secluded from the world, of monks or nuns under the jurisdiction of an abbot or abbess. Abbeys frequently competed with ... More
abbey

abbey   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
488 words

An abbey was a group of buildings occupied by a regular religious community, and was always directed, unlike a convent

abbey

abbey   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
35 words
1 [De] A community of monks or nuns ruled by an abbot or abbess. 2 [MC] A general term used to describe the buildings inhabited by a community of monks ... More
Abbey of Savigny

Abbey of Savigny  

In Normandy. In 1093 Vitalis of Mortain established a hermitage in the Forest of Savigny. Some of the hermits felt a call to follow the Rule of St Benedict in its primitive strictness, and the abbey ...
abbot

abbot  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(Aram., Syr., abba, ‘father’).The head of a Christian monastic community, especially in the Benedictine or Cistercian traditions. The term is used in translation for the head of communities in ...
acts of bishops

acts of bishops  

Bishops' acts refer to the texts (charters, letters) issued by bishops whether or not through the intermediary of an episcopal chancery. The earliest acts are testaments, by which are designated ...
Adalard of Corbie

Adalard of Corbie  

(751–826)A cousin of Charlemagne, Adalard was raised at court with his brother Wala. He retired to Corbie where, after a stay at Monte Cassino, he returned as abbot (780). ...
Adalbert of Prague

Adalbert of Prague  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(956–97),bishop and missionary martyr. Born at Libice (Bohemia) of a princely family, he was educated by Adalbert of Magdeburg. On the latter's death he returned to Prague, the proud possessor of a ...
Adhemar de Monteil

Adhemar de Monteil  

(d. 1098), Bp. of Le Puy from some time between 1080 and 1087. In 1095 Urban II summoned the Council of Clermont from Le Puy and made Adhémar his representative on the First Crusade. Adhémar's death ...
Admont

Admont  

(monastery) Oldest surviving monastery in Styria, Austria; founded 1074 by Archbishop Gebhard of Salzburg with an endowment left by Countess Hemma of Friesach and Zeltschach; famed for its ...
advocate, advocacy

advocate, advocacy  

From the Merovingian period, rulers granted churches an Immunity that protected them from the management and intervention of royal agents. Following a formula soon stereotyped, the latter were ...
Alcobaça

Alcobaça  

A Cistercian monastery, founded in 1152 by monks from Clairvaux, at the confluence of the Alcoa and the Baça, 100 kilometres north of Lisbon. This foundation must be set in ...
Alcuin

Alcuin  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
(c. 735–804)English scholar and theologian. In 782 was employed by Emperor Charlemagne as head of his palace school at Aachen, where his pupils included many of the outstanding figures in the ...
architecture, Ecclesiastical

architecture, Ecclesiastical  

Ecclesiastical architecture responds, from a purely practical point of view, primarily to the requirements of worship and secondarily to the needs of those who dedicate themselves to the religious ...
Arras

Arras  

Evangelized in the late 4th c. by St Diogenes, Arras owes its rise to the settlement in 658, in the marshes of the Crinchon, of a monastic community placed under ...
Augsburg

Augsburg  

(city, bishopric) Attested since the 8th century on the site of Roman Augusta Vindelicorum. A document of 1156 confirms the bishop’s lordship, conditioned by the citizens’ community. An imperial city ...
Augustinians

Augustinians  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
[Ge]A monastic order of ordained canons; most Augustinian houses were founded in the mid to late 12th century.

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