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Epimerisms

Epimerisms  

(sing. ἐπιμερισμός, “distribution, parsing”), elementary word-by-word commentaries on literary texts intended for school use and comprising parsing, morphology, orthography, prosody, semantics, and ...
koinē

koinē  

The form of Greek (koine = common) which was the international language after the death of Alexander the Great (323 bce) both in cities of Greece and throughout the Hellenistic world. It is a ...
language

language  

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Overview Page
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History
The principal languages of early modern Europe consist of six language families (Germanic, Romance, Slavic, Balto-Slavic, Finno-Ugric, and Celtic), a number of isolates (Greek, Albanian, Basque, and ...
morpheme

morpheme  

The smallest distinctive unit of a language having a definite grammatical function. For example, unhappiness contains three morphemes: un- (a morpheme denoting negation) + happi (happy) + -ness (a ...
physiognomy

physiognomy  

1. The physical appearance of one's face.2. The assessment of someone's character or personality from their face and other external bodily features.
syntax

syntax  

The arrangement of words and phrases to create well-formed sentences in a language. Recorded from the late 16th century, the word comes via French or late Latin from Greek suntaxis, from sun- ...
vernacular

vernacular  

The indigenous language or dialect commonly spoken by members of a community. See also Black English Vernacular. [From Latin vernaculus belonging to a household slave, from verna a household slave]
zoology

zoology  

The study of animals (including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, insects, spiders, and molluscs) and their structures and functions. Contrast zooecology. See also botany.

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