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date: 10 July 2020

A bright tank 

Source:
The Oxford Companion to Beer
Author(s):
Garrett OliverGarrett Oliver

is a dish-bottomed pressure-rated temperature-controlled tank used to hold beer in preparation for packaging. The term “bright” refers to “bright beer,” beer that has been rendered bright (clear) by filtration, centrifugation, fining, and/or maturation. In most breweries, beer will be filtered after leaving a uni-tank or lagering vessel and be directed into a bright tank. If the beer is to be force-carbonated, then the beer may be carbonated in-line, under pressure, between the fermenter or lagering tank and the bright tank. In this case, the beer should arrive at the bright tank with full carbonation. For in-tank carbonation (or adjustments), the bright tank will be fitted with a carbonation stone, a device through which carbon dioxide is forced, dispersing fine bubbles into the liquid for fast dissolution. Carbonation stones are usually made from either porous stone or sintered stainless steel. After carbonation, the beer is ready to be bottled or kegged (or both) directly from the bright tank. As the bright tank is the last stop before the package, careful attention is paid to quality assurance at this stage. Carbonation is closely checked and the brewery’s laboratory will run a series of tests.... ...

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