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date: 16 July 2019

Company Towns in the United States 

Source:
The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Urban History
Author(s):
Hardy GreenHardy Green

Company towns can be defined as communities dominated by a single company that is typically focused on one industry. Beyond that very basic definition, they varied in their essentials. Some were purpose-built by companies, often in remote areas convenient to needed natural resources. There, workers were often required to live in company-owned housing as a condition of employment. Others began as small towns with privately owned housing, usually expanding alongside a growing hometown corporation. Residences were shoddy in some company towns. In others, company-built housing may have been excellent, with indoor plumbing and central heating, and located close to such amenities as schools, libraries, perhaps even theaters.... ...

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