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date: 19 June 2021

Anti-Imperialism 

Source:
The Oxford Encyclopedia of the History of American Foreign Relations
Author(s):
Robert David JohnsonRobert David Johnson

The founding of the United States dated from a successful colonial revolt, and anti-imperialist rhetoric was embedded within the nation’s founding documents. “When a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object, evinces a design to reduce [the colonists] under absolute Despotism,” the Declaration of Independence asserted, “it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security. Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government.” A historian of Thomas Paine has noted that the propagandist was “deeply influenced by imperial misdeeds, not only in North America, where he arrived late in ... ...

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