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boxing

Developed from uncontrolled encounters, in which wrestling, kicking, gouging, biting, hair‐pulling, and kicking opponents when down were practised. Early prize fights went on until one of ...

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Visual English Dictionary

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
43 words
Illustration(s):
3

... ring boxer punchbag ring Keywords apron boxer canvas corner corner pad corner stool judge physician referee ring post ring step ringside rope second timekeeper trainer turnbuckle boxer Keywords bandage boxing gloves boxing trunks cup protector glove gumshield headgear lace punchbag Keywords...

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Food and Fitness: A Dictionary of Diet and Exercise (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

... Boxing is an arduous contact sport requiring very high levels of physical fitness and controlled aggression. There is little doubt that professional boxing is dangerous and can cause serious, even fatal injuries. Many people believe that it is unacceptably hazardous and should be banned. However, supporters of amateur boxing, including some physicians, believe that the amateur code should be considered differently from the professional code. They emphasize that the main aim of amateur boxing is to score points and not to knock out the opponent. Therefore,...

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A Dictionary of British History (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
103 words

... developed from uncontrolled encounters, in which wrestling, kicking, gouging, biting, hair‐pulling, and kicking opponents when down were practised. Early prize fights went on until one of the combatants could not continue. By 1838 London Prize Ring rules were in use, with a roped‐off ring. The Queensberry rules from 1867 onwards took some time to establish themselves: they included padded gloves, 3‐minute rounds, and a 10‐second knock‐out. The Amateur Boxing Association was set up in 1880 and boxing was brought into the Olympic Games in 1904 . In...

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World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
178 words

...by a ringside referee or three judges. Boxing developed from bareknuckle fighting when the Marquess of Queensberry's rules introduced timed rounds and padded gloves in 1866 . Despite worldwide popularity, boxing is under pressure to introduce further safety measures or be abolished, with brain damage, comas and deaths worryingly regular. The international sport is now controlled by three major rival organizations: the World Boxing Association ( WBA ), the World Boxing Council ( WBC ), and the International Boxing Federation ( IBF...

boxing

boxing   Reference library

Robert Leslie Howland and Stephen J. Instone

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
167 words

... In Greek and Roman boxing there was no classification of competitors by weight and so the advantage was generally with the heavier man. The Greeks bound leather thongs (ἱμάντες) round their wrists and knuckles, to protect them rather than to increase the severity of the blow. Sometimes the fingers, or some of them, were left free, though this may have been the practice in the pankration rather than specifically boxing. For training they used softer padded gloves (σφαῖραι). Body-blows were not generally used and the face was always the principal target....

Boxing

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Edward R. BEAUCHAMP, David LEVINSON, and Stan SHIPLEY

Berkshire Encyclopedia of World Sport (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Social sciences, Society and culture
Length:
4,315 words

...is corruption. One major appeal of boxing for fans is betting on their fighter. In the past the fixing of matches was a serious issue, although since the crackdown on organized crime’s control of boxing in the 1950s it is now less common. The issue now is the fixing of rankings by the competing boxing associations. Professional boxing matches are sanctioned and boxers ranked by four competing organizations—the World Boxing Association, the World Boxing Council, the World Boxing Organization, and the International Boxing Federation. Observers charge that...

boxing

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J. A. Cannon

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
172 words

...time to establish themselves: they included padded gloves, 3-minute rounds, and a 10-second knock-out. Weight divisions were gradually introduced where previously heavyweights had dominated. The Amateur Boxing Association was set up in 1880 and boxing was brought into the Olympic Games in 1904 . In professional boxing, the British Board of Control has supervised since 1919 , though international authorities have proliferated. The introduction of radio and then television has vastly increased the purses which boxers can command. J. A....

boxing

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The Oxford Companion to Medicine (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Medicine and health
Length:
1,415 words

...when a boxer first applies for a license. The great debate With all this medical background to the trauma of boxing, it might seem surprising that this sport is allowed to continue in a civilized society. Thus ensues the great boxing debate. The first question is whether boxing is really a noble art, or whether it provides a Roman holiday for a crude populace. Whatever medical, and particularly neurological, disorders may be a consequence of boxing, they will be of little avail to those who wish to curb or control ‘the sport’, unless the social and immediate...

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A Dictionary of Sports Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Social sciences, Society and culture
Length:
732 words

...of a nation, ethnic group, or race. The moral controversy over boxing is simple: how can an activity whose primary goal is to render an opponent defenceless and senseless be considered an acceptable form of sport in a civilized age? A legal ban on boxing in Sweden in 1970 was questioned and reframed 35 years later, and live boxing bouts can still fill halls in large cities and provide lucrative schedules for international broadcasts. Prior to the codified form of the sport, bare-knuckle boxing provided bloody spectacles for gentry and common people alike,...

boxing

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The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
253 words

...boxing has only occasionally attained a high profile in Ireland. The Irish Amateur Boxing Association ( IABA ) was formed in Dublin in 1911 , though individual clubs had existed for some years. The sport was encouraged by both the police and the army, and in Trinity College . Despite the murder of the IABA chairman, a policeman, in 1920 , there was great continuity in amateur boxing after partition . The IABA continued as an all‐Ireland body, and the Gárda Síochána and Free State army emerged as the sport's main sponsors. The National Boxing...

Boxing

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Elliot J. Gorn

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Cultural and Intellectual History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Queensberry rules that mandated three-minute rounds and imposed other restrictions. Attracting a widening audience, Sullivan earned over 1 million dollars and became America's first great sports celebrity. Boxing's modern era dates from 1892 , when James J. Corbett ( 1866–1933 ), fighting under the Queensberry rules, defeated the aging Sullivan. Boxing now appealed to a broader spectrum of men seeking an elusive sense of masculinity in an era of economic change. Rapidly developing media—mass-circulation newspapers, radio, and finally television—connected...

Boxing.

Boxing.   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to United States History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
530 words

...Queensberry rules that mandated three-minute rounds and imposed other restrictions. Attracting a widening audience, Sullivan earned over one million dollars and became America's first great sports celebrity. Boxing's modern era dates from 1892 , when James J. Corbett ( 1866–1933 ), fighting under the Queensberry rules, defeated the aging Sullivan. Boxing now appealed to a broader spectrum of men seeking an elusive sense of masculinity in an era of economic change. Rapidly developing media—mass-circulation newspapers, radio , and finally television—connected...

boxing

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The Oxford Companion to Canadian History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
273 words

... . Boxing in Canada grew out of bare-knuckle prize fighting, which had an unsavoury reputation because of its bloody violence and its association with gambling. After the introduction of the Marquis of Queensbury rules the sport garnered a measure of respectability. Boxing was considered one of the ‘manly arts’, and boxers were venerated for their courage and skill. The first Canadian boxer to win national and international status was George ‘Little Chocolate’ Dixon , an African–Nova Scotian, who won the world bantamweight title in 1888 and subsequently...

Boxing

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Encyclopedia of African American History 1896 to the Present

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
5,626 words
Illustration(s):
1

...boxing promoter. Olsen, Jack . Black Is Best: The Riddle of Cassius Clay . New York: G. P. Putnam, 1967. A psychological study of Muhammad Ali and his role in American society. Roberts, Randy . Papa Jack: Jack Johnson and the Era of White Hopes . New York: Free Press, 1983. A study of the social and psychological impact of Jack Johnson's boxing career. Sammons, Jeffrey T. Beyond the Ring: The Role of Boxing in American Society . Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1988. A historical overview of the racial and social dimensions of professional boxing in...

Boxing

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Oxford Dictionary of Humorous Quotations (5 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
311 words

... Boxing Boxing see also sports I figure I'll be champ for about ten years and then I'll let my brother take over—like the Kennedys down in Washington. before becoming world heavyweight champion in 1964 Muhammad Ali 1942 – American boxer : attributed, 1979 champ for about ten years let my brother take over like the Kennedys It's gonna be a thrilla, a chilla, and a killa, When I get the gorilla in Manila. Muhammad Ali 1942 – American boxer : in 1975; attributed thriller , a chilla, and a killa get the gorilla in Manila get the gorilla...

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Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
400 words

... Boxing see also Sports I'm the greatest. Muhammad Ali ( Cassius Clay ) 1942 – 2016 American boxer adopted as his catchphrase from 1962, in Louisville Times 16 November 1962 I'm the greatest Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee. summary of his boxing strategy (probably originated by his aide Drew ‘Bundini’ Brown) Muhammad Ali ( Cassius Clay ) 1942 – 2016 American boxer G. Sullivan Cassius Clay Story (1964) ch. 8 float like a butterfly Float like a butterfly sting like a bee sting like a bee It's just a job. Grass grows, birds...

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A Dictionary of Dentistry

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Medicine and health, Dentistry
Length:
30 words

... v. The process of providing a provisional wall around the perimeter of an impression, usually of wax, to contain the material poured into the impression until it has...

boxing

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Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
98 words

... In Greek and Roman boxing there was no classification of competitors by weight and so the advantage was generally with the heavier man. The Greeks bound leather thongs round their wrists and knuckles, to protect them rather than to increase the severity of the blow. For training they used softer padded gloves. The face was always the principal target. The Romans used the caestus , a glove weighted with pieces of iron and having metal spikes placed round the knuckles, and boxing was often more of a gladiatorial show than an athletic sport. See agones ; ...

boxing

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The Oxford Companion to the Body

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Science and technology, Life Sciences
Length:
1,034 words

...brains are no more resilient than in the past. Some nations, notably Sweden, have already banned boxing on medical grounds. So far the British government has been reluctant to follow the Swedish lead and since 1981 five private members' anti-boxing Bills proposed in parliament have failed to reach the statute books. Most schools, both state and public, however, have dropped boxing from their physical education curriculum. Yet it should be noted that amateur boxing is exceptionally well regulated: not more than four rounds are fought, headguards are worn, and...

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Pocket Modern Oxford Welsh Dictionary: English-Welsh

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries
Length:
4 words

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