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street food

street food   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...against street food, and certainly the rich subculture of street hawkers and vendors described by Henry Mayhew in his account of the London poor in the 1850s did not continue in the face of the growth of the retail trade and other manifestations of a modern economy. But in fact, street food did not so much disappear in these circumstances as change. The hawker took on a motorized van, the street vendor moved indoors and developed a take-away trade. Similarly, countries such as Singapore have retained a vibrant (albeit disciplined) street food scene and...

street food, ancient

street food, ancient   Reference library

Sally Grainger

The Oxford Companion to Sugar and Sweets

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...food, ancient . Street food dominated the daily lives of the lower- and middle-income groups in ancient urban societies, such as those of Athens and Rome. Because the lower classes may have had no more than a sleeping space and certainly no kitchen, many of their daily food needs were met on the street, in the form of both sweet and savory pastries and other dough products. Honey boiled into syrup provided the sweetener for the many forms of deep-fried fritters that seem to have been common. See fried dough and fritters . One particular type (...

street food

street food noun   Quick reference

New Oxford American Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
61 words
street food

street food noun   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of English (3 ed.)

Reference type:
English Dictionary
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
English Dictionaries and Thesauri
Length:
69 words
dan dan noodles

dan dan noodles   Quick reference

The Diner’s Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...dan noodles Street food from the Szechwan province of west central China, consisting of noodles cooked in a spicy sauce that typically includes Szechwan pepper . Dan dan refers literally to the carrying-pole used by street...

satay

satay   Quick reference

The Diner’s Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...A Malaysian and Indonesian food, consisting of small spicy meatballs speared on skewers (traditionally made from the stems of coconut leaves), grilled or barbecued, and typically served with a peanut sauce. It is street-food, sold by vendors to passing trade. The name is...

bun cha

bun cha   Quick reference

The Diner’s Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...cha A Vietnamese dish consisting of fine rice noodles ( bun ) served in a fish-sauce-based broth with a topping of quickly grilled ( cha ) pork strips or small pork patties, and a green salad. This is street food, available on almost every corner in...

tostada

tostada   Quick reference

The Diner’s Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...A tostada, or tostado, is an item of Mexican street food consisting of a deep-fried maize-flour pancake topped with a mixture that would typically include beans, minced meat, and vegetables: ‘The sweetcorn tostado, a tower of crisp corn tortillas filled with black beans, was a success’, Time Out London, Eating and Drinking ( 2009 ). The word comes from the past participle of Spanish tostar ‘to...

poutine

poutine   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...Other tiny fish which are similarly appreciated in Provence are nonnat ( see goby ) and melet ( see silverside ). Poutine has a different meaning in Canada, where it refers to a street food of Montreal. This is described as ‘an amazing concoction of French fries, cheese and gravy’ by Cynthia Wine ( 1985 ) , who gives further details of this and other such popular street foods...

Tex-Mex

Tex-Mex   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...another is chili con carne and the related chilli gravy which accompanies many street foods. Tacos, burritos, and nachos are original Mexican foods which have been altered to suit a different gamut of preferences. Thus nachos are fried tortilla chips or tostadas covered with melted cheese and jalapeño peppers. They were, by repute, developed by a Mexican restaurateur for wives of American airmen based near the town of Coahuila in 1943 . What are Mexican street foods, tacos, enchiladas, and tostadas, eaten in the hand, are elaborated for an American...

pakora

pakora   Reference library

Helen Saberi

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... ( pakaura ) are batter-fried vegetables or fish, usually eaten as an appetizer or snack in India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan. They are a popular street food. The batter is usually made of besan flour and water. They are flavoured with spices such as turmeric, coriander, and cayenne. Pakora are particularly popular with vegetarians. A variety of vegetables can be used such as onion rings, cauliflower, cabbage, sliced aubergines, potatoes, carrots, cucumber, celery, and spinach. Pakora can also be made with cooked rice or semolina and also panir ...

mohinga

mohinga   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...is as thin as soup. This is accompanied by a number of side dishes ranging from hard-boiled eggs, limes, fried garlic, spring onions, chickpeas, chillies, bite-size patties made from shrimp or mung beans, and slices of the tender heart of banana palms. Mohinga is a popular street food and is available at nearly every street corner or market place where the itinerant vendors have set up their...

Vendy Awards

Vendy Awards   Reference library

Dave Cook

Savoring Gotham: A Food Lover’s Companion to New York City

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...Awards First presented in November 2005 in a cramped, unheated street cart storage space in the East Village, the Vendy Awards have grown into a sprawling outdoor celebration of New York’s best street food. In a festival atmosphere, competitors prepare their dishes for judges and attendees. Proceeds benefit the Street Vendor Project, which provides legal assistance and advocacy for vendors of food and merchandise. See street vendor project . Only a single award—the Vendy Cup, for best overall—was presented in that initial year. Hallo Berlin, a purveyor...

giblets

giblets   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...make this broth. Giblet stew, often but not invariably of goose, is still encountered in south-west France, sometimes using the head, neck, feet, and wings as well as innards. It goes under the name of alicot ( Strang 1991 ). In the economic downturn of the 1970s, Filipino street-food vendors made use of every part of the chicken, offering combs, feet, intestines, and necks skewered and grilled over charcoal. They gave each part modern ‘pop’ names such as ‘adidas’ for the feet and ‘IUD’ for the...

khichri

khichri   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...dish known as kedgeree ( see anglo-indian cookery ). In addition, as Zubaida ( 1994 ) points out in an interesting passage about the diffusion of foods and dishes, it has a further history: A good example of imperceptible diffusion is the Cairo kushuri, an ever-popular street food, a dish of rice and lentils, often bulked up with the even cheaper macaroni, served with a garnish of fried onion and spicy sauces. I have not been able to find any satisfactory accounts of the origin of this dish in Egypt. I can only assume that it is the Indian kitchri, also...

lassi

lassi   Reference library

Helen Saberi

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

... an Indian yoghurt drink of which there are two versions: salted and sweet. In both versions, it is a popular street food as well as being made in homes. The quality of the yoghurt is very important for a good lassi. It should be slightly sour so that when diluted with water it still retains a strong yoghurt flavour. It should also be creamy otherwise the lassi will taste watery. The sweet version is known as metha lassi . It often just has sugar added, but is sometimes flavoured with rose-water; and in Bengal a squirt of gondo lebu (scented lime) may...

Street Vendors, Regulation of

Street Vendors, Regulation of   Reference library

Dave Cook

Savoring Gotham: A Food Lover’s Companion to New York City

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

... 1939 . See essex street market . His administration also sharply reduced the number of pushcart permits. The new, indoor markets could accommodate only a fraction of the displaced vendors, forcing many to go on relief or to operate outside the law. Subsequent generations of street-food vendors have found that the supply of permits still falls far short of demand. Permits were capped during the administration of Ed Koch, who became mayor in 1978 on a law-and-order platform, and with few exceptions have not been increased in decades, enabling a large black...

chestnut

chestnut   Quick reference

The Diner’s Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...to the same extent as the French ( see marrons glacés ) and other inhabitants of southern Europe (who at times in the past have subsisted on them), but they have always had a soft spot for hot roasted chestnuts, which are one of the few survivals of traditional British street food. The chest - of chestnut traces its history back to Greek kastanéā , which some etymologists think denoted originally ‘nut from Castanea’ (in Pontus, Asia Minor) or ‘ nut from Castana’ (in Thessaly, Greece)—although a likelier derivation may be from Armenian kaskeni ....

congee

congee   Reference library

Helen Saberi

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...bowl. With one breath of sucking along the rim of the bowl, you can swallow a quarter of a bowl of congee. This is because the congee is cooler at the rim. If you needed three bowls to quell your hunger, it didn’t take long to get them with this method. Congee is a prominent street food. It is easily digested and perhaps for this reason is regarded as a good pick-me-up after exercise or illness. Helen...

duff

duff   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Food (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014

...that the cook ‘jes’ bogged down a few raisins in dough an’ called ’er puddin’. And in England a duff was for long counted as a cheap and filling item which would appear frequently in school or other institutional menus, especially for sailors. When Mayhew reported on London street foods in 1861 , there were six vendors still hawking hot duff shaped either as a pudding or in ‘roly poly’ form: ‘Hot pudding used to be [20 or 30 years earlier] of much more extensive sale.’ However, plum duff can claim one illustrious relation, namely christmas pudding , of...

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