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Dyrrachium, Naval Battle of

Dyrrachium, Naval Battle of   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Medieval Warfare and Military Technology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

...See book 4. Malaterra, Geoffrey . The Deeds of Count Roger of Calabria and Sicily and of His Brother Duke Robert Guiscard . Translated by KennethBaxter Wolf . Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2005. See book 3. Stanton, Charles D . “ Naval Power in the Norman Conquest of Southern Italy and Sicily ”. Haskins Society Journal 19 (2007): 120–136. William of Apulia . The Deeds of Robert Guiscard . Translated by G. A. Loud . http://www.leeds.ac.uk/history/weblearning/MedievalHistoryTextCentre/medievalTexts.htm . See book 4. Valerie...

Roger I

Roger I (1071–1101)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Medieval Warfare and Military Technology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

...2005. William of Apulia . The Deeds of Robert Guiscard . Translated by G. A. Loud . Medieval History Texts in Translation. University of Leeds, U.K. http://www.leeds.ac.uk/history/weblearning/MedievalHistoryTextCentre/ . Secondary Works Brown, Gordon S. The Norman Conquest of Southern Italy and Sicily . Jefferson, N.C.: MacFarland, 2003. Cuozzo, Errico . La cavalleria nel regno Normanno di Sicilia . Atripalda, Italy: Melphite, 2002. Bernard Doumerc Translated from the French by Johanna M....

Norman Conquests

Norman Conquests   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Medieval Warfare and Military Technology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

...and the city surrendered to its besiegers in the following year. In February 1091 Noto fell after a short campaign, and the island was finally conquered. In 1130 the Norman leader Roger II ( 1095–1154 ) was crowned king of Sicily, having consolidated all the Norman conquests of southern Italy and Sicily into one kingdom. Antioch. Norman conquests also spread into the Latin East during the First Crusade. Two contingents were led by the Normans Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy (c. 1051–1134 ), and Bohemond of Taranto ( 1058–1111 ), Robert Guiscard’s ...

annals and chronicles

annals and chronicles   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
4,994 words

...kingdom of Sicily ( Liber de regno Siciliae ) between 1154 and 1169 . Royal or ducal rulers, city councils, bishops, and other powerful entities commissioned chronicles, especially because the chronicle effectively served for the patron’s self-aggrandizement. The Norman conquest of southern Italy led to the production of a number of important chronicles reflecting this event, such as Amatus’ Historia Normannorum ( c .1075 –to c .1101 ), which has survived only in a French translation ( Ystoire de li Normant , after 1268 ). Robert Guiscard is the centre of...

Amatus of Montecassino

Amatus of Montecassino (1098–9?)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
74 words

...of Montecassino (d. before 1098–9? ) Perhaps Bishop Amatus of Paestum ( 1047–58? ); monk at *Monte Cassino by 1061 . Author of both the (poorly transmitted) earliest account of the Norman conquest of southern *Italy and of an epic on the deeds of St Peter. John McDonald Howe Amatus of Montecassino , History of the Normans , tr. P. Dunbar with G. Loud (2004). A. Lentini , Il Poema di Amato su S. Pietro Apostolo ...

Amatus of Monte cassino

Amatus of Monte cassino (1105)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
147 words

...Abbot Desiderius ( 1058–1087 ), and Peter the Deacon praises him as writer and poet. He wrote a poem on the apostles Peter and Paul , dedicated to Gregory VII ; we know the titles of two more works. Finally he was the author of a history of the Norman conquest of southern Italy , written c. 1083 and dedicated to Abbot Desiderius; we possess only a French translation made around 1300 . In it he exalts the fidelity of the conquerors and presents Prince Richard and Duke Robert Guiscard as models of magnanimity and Humility . Storia...

Carbone

Carbone   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
217 words

...the Basilicata, probably under the influence of St. Sabas the Younger . While Loukas was active primarily in Armentum, his successors, seeking a refuge from the Arabs, retired to Carbone; nonetheless, one of its superiors, Menas , was captured by them. After the Norman conquest of southern Italy Carbone flourished under the patronage of the feudal family of Chiaromonte. Greek monks continued to reside in Carbone until the 16th C. Despite two fires (in 1174 and 1432 ) part of the monastic archive survives, including eight Greek documents of 1007–61 ....

Montecassino

Montecassino (529)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
541 words

... lived with some 60 disciples in Valleluce, a metochion of Montecassino; some Benedictine monks from Montecassino migrated to Mt. Athos, Jerusalem, and Mt. Sinai. A Greek monk from Calabria, Basil , was abbot of Montecassino from 1036 to 1038 . During the Norman conquest of southern Italy Abbot Desiderius ( 1058–87 ) actively supported the invaders, who bestowed lavish donations on the monastery. Nevertheless, between 1076 and 1112 , Michael VII and Alexios I sent sumptuous gifts to the abbots of Montecassino, hoping for their mediation in...

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