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Collisions, Naval

Although naval ships are often technically better equipped than merchant ships to avoid collisions, the risk of collision is increased by naval manoeuvres under real or simulated combat ...

naval

naval   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
142 words

... ; navel . Naval , adj. , = of, relating to, or involving ships or a navy. Navel , n., = belly button. The correct phrase is navel orange , which has a navel-like depression at the top. But the mistaken phrase ✳naval orange is fairly common—e.g.: • “Riverside, home of the naval [read navel ] orange, celebrates its orange history with a ‘gourmet grove’ of orange delicacies.” Mary Frances Smith , “Festivals, Feasts & Fairs,” L.A. Times , 7 Apr. 1996 , at 3. • “Sun Pacific, the largest naval orange [read navel-orange ] grower in California and...

naval law

naval law   Reference library

Australian Law Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
93 words

...naval law The law governing naval operations as well as naval administration and discipline. Law of naval operations usually distinguishes between the law of naval warfare (including prize law) and law regulating other operations. Law relating to naval administration and discipline is usually treated as part of defence force administration and discipline law generally. The term naval law is used to distinguish these areas of substantive law from military law or civilian maritime law. See Control of Naval Waters Act 1918 (Cth), Defence Force...

naval property

naval property   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law Enforcement (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Law
Length:
27 words

... property Any chattel belonging to the Crown that is issued, or stored for the purpose of being issued when required, for naval purposes. Compare military stores...

Naval Militia

Naval Militia   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...Guard. During World War I, however, naval militia units lost their state designation when members were assigned indiscriminately to U.S. Navy ships. The Naval Reserve Act of 1938 permanently federalized the naval militia as a training unit for the U.S. Naval Reserve s. Unlike National Guardsmen, naval militiamen now volunteered to serve first in the reserves, then the militia. Reflecting the trend toward federal supervision and the emphasis on billet over unit training, only three states continued their naval militia units by 1960 . [See also Militia...

naval hoods

naval hoods   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
41 words

... hoods or whoods , large pieces of thick timber which were used in the days of sailing navies to encircle the hawseholes in order to take the wear caused by the heavy hemp cables when a ship rode to its...

Naval Administration

Naval Administration   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Military History
Length:
6,147 words

... Administration Naval administration is a broad term for managerial activities and organizational structures that transform policy and political ambitions into naval power and operations at sea. It is therefore the critical nexus among society, state, and naval organization. Privateering, piracy, and maritime trade supported by armed ships also require administration, but private enterprises are not regarded as naval unless the entrepreneurs cooperate with a political authority. Administrative efforts are necessary for mobilization and utilization of human,...

Naval Sakhi

Naval Sakhi  

The Oxford Encyclopaedia of the Music of India

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Subject:
Music

... Sakhi ( b. ?; d. ?) Performer of devotional dances in the temple of Radha Vallabhji in Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh . He lived in the 18th cent. in Karhala village of the same region. His real name was Naval Kishore, but after becoming a disciple of Goswāmi Brijlāl , he chose the suffix Sakhi, indicating a specific type of intimate devotion to Kriṣhṇa. He spent his last days in Barsana of the same region....

Warfare—Naval

Warfare—Naval   Reference library

Wade G. DUDLEY

Berkshire Encyclopedia of World History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
History
Length:
1,864 words

...P. M. (1976). The rise and fall of British naval mastery . New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons. Mahan, A. T. (1918). The influence of sea power upon history, 1660–1783 . Boston: Little, Brown and Company. Mahan, A. T. (1991). Mahan on naval strategy: Selections from the writings of rear Admiral Alfred Thayer Mahan . ( J. B. Hattendorf , Ed.). Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press. Rodgers, W. L. (1937). Greek and Roman naval warfare . Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press. Rodgers, W. L. (1939). Naval warfare under oars, 4th to 16th century: A...

naval service

naval service   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
112 words

... service . The naval service of independent Ireland, a subordinate arm of the army , was established in 1946 . It succeeded the ill‐starred marine service, hastily improvised in 1939 and dismissed by the army chief of staff as ‘unreliable’ in 1945 . It suffered monumental neglect—for some months in 1970 it had no operational craft—until its fleet of three elderly corvettes was gradually replaced by modern patrol vessels, some Irish built, in the 1970s and 1980s. The expanded service is now engaged mainly on fisheries protection duties in Ireland's...

naval power

naval power   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...the merely material elements in the power and prosperity of nations.’ Mahan's views on the nature and the prospects of naval power were somewhat moderated by the other main naval theorist of the time, Sir Julian Corbett . A lawyer by training, Corbett was a prominent thinker on the nature of naval power in Britain before WW I. He had a much more judicious sense of the limitations of naval power than Mahan, so much so in fact that he tended to avoid the word. Instead he talked about ‘maritime power’, a phrase he adopted in order to give some emphasis to the...

naval court

naval court   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law (9 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
198 words

...naval court A court formerly convened under the Merchant Shipping Act 1894 either by the captain of one of HM ships on foreign station or by a consular officer. Its purpose was to inquire into the abandonment or loss of any British ship, any complaint by an officer or seaman of such a ship, or any other matter requiring investigation in the interests of the owners of the ship or its cargo. It reported to the Department of Trade and Industry and had limited disciplinary powers. A naval court consisted of three to five members, each of whom was either a naval...

Prisons, Naval

Prisons, Naval   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Military History
Length:
1,738 words
Illustration(s):
1

...use its own detention facilities rather than mix naval prisoners with regular convicts. In Britain, the Admiralty first used the former county jail of Sussex in Lewes. This facility, acquired in 1862 , could house approximately 120 naval prisoners. In April 1888 , part of the civil prison near Bodmin, Cornwall , was also converted for use as a naval prison. On foreign stations the Royal Navy employed a combination of civil facilities, such as the county prison in Halifax, Nova Scotia, and purpose-built naval facilities. The U.S. Navy relied on civil prisons...

naval warfare

naval warfare   Reference library

Jonatan Christiansen and Oliver Nicholson

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... Africa in 428/9 affected the balance of naval power in the western Mediterranean; in 455 they sacked Rome , they acquired Corsica and Sardinia , and were in a position to threaten Alexandria ( VDanStyl 56). Leo I ’s colossal naval expedition of 468, commanded by Basiliscus , ended in a crushing Vandal naval victory off Cape Bon. Belisarius’ battles with the Vandals took place on land, and the Byzantine invasion of Italy was also mostly fought out on land, although the Ostrogoths were defeated in a naval battle off Ancona in 551 (Procopius, ...

Mines, Naval

Mines, Naval   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...easily laid down, and require little maintenance. Yet they have the explosive ability to sink or badly damage even large vessels by blowing open their hull below the waterline. Consequently, smaller naval powers have often used them to impede the larger fleets of major powers. Naval mines originated in the sixteenth century, but their use in naval combat began in the American Revolutionary War by David Bushnell , who placed such devices under the hulls of British ships in New York harbor using a small one‐man, wooden submarine he invented. During...

Naval Diplomacy

Naval Diplomacy   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Military History
Length:
1,800 words

...naval artillery and shipbuilding of the sixteenth century that made large-scale naval wars possible. Thus the Elizabethan navy is often associated with its most dramatic sea battle, the defeat of the Spanish Armada in 1588 . Yet more typical was the licensing of privateers to harass the Spanish monarchy at sea in order to avoid a direct conflict. Indeed, full-scale naval battles have always been rare, as have determined national efforts to control the sea through battle fleet superiority. More than mere blunt instruments of war, navies are most commonly used...

Naval Logistics

Naval Logistics   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Military History
Length:
5,086 words

...investigations that serve as case studies of particular national naval developments and logistical procedures or serve as in-depth examinations of the logistics of a particular navy in a narrowly specified time period. [ See also Health and Health Care ; Hospitals ; Naval Administration ; Naval Dockyards and Bases ; Ordnance ; Prisoners of War ; Prisons, Naval ; Recruitment ; Shipbuilding Materials ; Ship Construction ; and Victualling .] Baugh, Daniel A. British Naval Administration in the Age of Walpole . Princeton, N.J.: Princeton...

naval history

naval history   Reference library

David Denis Aldridge

The Oxford Companion to British History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
590 words

...cosmography’, encouraged the beginnings of naval history as a scholarly discipline, separable from the demands of canvassing causes. Canvassing of course continued—how could it not, given such issues as the state of the early 17th-cent. navy, the self-perpetuating problems of timber supply, and manning? But the triumphs over the Dutch and Spanish 60 years after the Armada afforded the English an awareness of the implications of maritime superiority. No man in his time was better equipped to write a comprehensive naval history than Samuel Pepys , and by 1680 ...

Naval Guns

Naval Guns   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...range. By the 1940s, however, naval guns were losing their preeminence as the arbiters of combat at sea, first to airplanes, and most recently and more decisively, to guided missiles. Naval guns survive today only in vestigial form, as weapons for close‐in defense and as instruments of communication: despite far‐reaching technological change, there remains no substitute in naval communication for a shot fired across the bow. [See also Battleships ; Dahlgren, John ; Precision‐Guided Munitions ; Rodman, Thomas ; Weaponry, Naval. ] James P. Baxter , The...

Naval Architecture

Naval Architecture   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Military History
Length:
7,131 words

...Boudriot, Jean . The Seventy-Four Gun Ship: A Practical Treatise on the Art of Naval Architecture . Translated by David H. Roberts. 4 vols. Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press, 1986–1988. The finest and most detailed analysis of a sailing warship ever published. Brown, David K. A Century of Naval Construction: The History of the Royal Corps of Naval Constructors, 1883–1983 . London: Conway Maritime Press, 1983. Details the important story of the professionalization of naval constructors. Bulley, Anne , The Bombay Country Ships, 1790–1833 . Richmond,...

naval architecture

naval architecture   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
1,146 words
Illustration(s):
2

...early naval architects was unscientific and generally followed specifications of shape and scantlings which had been in use for generations. A more scientific approach was attempted by the Swedish naval architect Frederik af Chapman ( 1721–1808 ) and others. Chapman wrote a well-regarded treatise on the subject. But it was not until the British engineer William Froude ( 1810–79 ) began to study hydrodynamics and ship behaviour in the late 1860s, by undertaking more sophisticated tank testing, that any advance of importance occurred. Modern naval...

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