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Collisions, Naval

Although naval ships are often technically better equipped than merchant ships to avoid collisions, the risk of collision is increased by naval manoeuvres under real or simulated combat ...

naval

naval   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
142 words

... ; navel . Naval , adj. , = of, relating to, or involving ships or a navy. Navel , n., = belly button. The correct phrase is navel orange , which has a navel-like depression at the top. But the mistaken phrase ✳naval orange is fairly common—e.g.: • “Riverside, home of the naval [read navel ] orange, celebrates its orange history with a ‘gourmet grove’ of orange delicacies.” Mary Frances Smith , “Festivals, Feasts & Fairs,” L.A. Times , 7 Apr. 1996 , at 3. • “Sun Pacific, the largest naval orange [read navel-orange ] grower in California and...

naval law

naval law   Reference library

Australian Law Dictionary (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Law
Length:
93 words

...naval law The law governing naval operations as well as naval administration and discipline. Law of naval operations usually distinguishes between the law of naval warfare (including prize law) and law regulating other operations. Law relating to naval administration and discipline is usually treated as part of defence force administration and discipline law generally. The term naval law is used to distinguish these areas of substantive law from military law or civilian maritime law. See Control of Naval Waters Act 1918 (Cth), Defence Force...

naval property

naval property   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Law Enforcement (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Law
Length:
27 words

... property Any chattel belonging to the Crown that is issued, or stored for the purpose of being issued when required, for naval purposes. Compare military stores...

Naval Militia

Naval Militia   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to American Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...Guard. During World War I, however, naval militia units lost their state designation when members were assigned indiscriminately to U.S. Navy ships. The Naval Reserve Act of 1938 permanently federalized the naval militia as a training unit for the U.S. Naval Reserve s. Unlike National Guardsmen, naval militiamen now volunteered to serve first in the reserves, then the militia. Reflecting the trend toward federal supervision and the emphasis on billet over unit training, only three states continued their naval militia units by 1960 . [See also Militia...

naval hoods

naval hoods   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
41 words

... hoods or whoods , large pieces of thick timber which were used in the days of sailing navies to encircle the hawseholes in order to take the wear caused by the heavy hemp cables when a ship rode to its...

Naval Administration

Naval Administration   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Maritime History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Military History
Length:
6,147 words

... Administration Naval administration is a broad term for managerial activities and organizational structures that transform policy and political ambitions into naval power and operations at sea. It is therefore the critical nexus among society, state, and naval organization. Privateering, piracy, and maritime trade supported by armed ships also require administration, but private enterprises are not regarded as naval unless the entrepreneurs cooperate with a political authority. Administrative efforts are necessary for mobilization and utilization of human,...

Naval Sakhi

Naval Sakhi  

The Oxford Encyclopaedia of the Music of India

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Subject:
Music

... Sakhi ( b. ?; d. ?) Performer of devotional dances in the temple of Radha Vallabhji in Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh . He lived in the 18th cent. in Karhala village of the same region. His real name was Naval Kishore, but after becoming a disciple of Goswāmi Brijlāl , he chose the suffix Sakhi, indicating a specific type of intimate devotion to Kriṣhṇa. He spent his last days in Barsana of the same region....

Warfare—Naval

Warfare—Naval   Reference library

Wade G. DUDLEY

Berkshire Encyclopedia of World History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
History
Length:
1,864 words

...P. M. (1976). The rise and fall of British naval mastery . New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons. Mahan, A. T. (1918). The influence of sea power upon history, 1660–1783 . Boston: Little, Brown and Company. Mahan, A. T. (1991). Mahan on naval strategy: Selections from the writings of rear Admiral Alfred Thayer Mahan . ( J. B. Hattendorf , Ed.). Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press. Rodgers, W. L. (1937). Greek and Roman naval warfare . Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press. Rodgers, W. L. (1939). Naval warfare under oars, 4th to 16th century: A...

naval service

naval service   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Irish History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
112 words

... service . The naval service of independent Ireland, a subordinate arm of the army , was established in 1946 . It succeeded the ill‐starred marine service, hastily improvised in 1939 and dismissed by the army chief of staff as ‘unreliable’ in 1945 . It suffered monumental neglect—for some months in 1970 it had no operational craft—until its fleet of three elderly corvettes was gradually replaced by modern patrol vessels, some Irish built, in the 1970s and 1980s. The expanded service is now engaged mainly on fisheries protection duties in Ireland's...

naval power

naval power   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Military History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...the merely material elements in the power and prosperity of nations.’ Mahan's views on the nature and the prospects of naval power were somewhat moderated by the other main naval theorist of the time, Sir Julian Corbett . A lawyer by training, Corbett was a prominent thinker on the nature of naval power in Britain before WW I. He had a much more judicious sense of the limitations of naval power than Mahan, so much so in fact that he tended to avoid the word. Instead he talked about ‘maritime power’, a phrase he adopted in order to give some emphasis to the...

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