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magic

magic   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
685 words

... + stonat + Iesus predicat + Christus regnat + erex + arex + rymex + Christi eleyzon + eeeeeeeee .” Churchmen would certainly judge such a formula as superstitious and perhaps also as magical, especially if it contained unintelligible words that might be names of demons . Magical drugs could also be used for healing: e.g. mandrake was effective for gout, eye disease, earache and many other ailments; a vulture's brains cured head diseases, its kidneys and testicles overcame impotence, and its other organs served further purposes. Magic...

Psalms, Hymns, and Prayers

Psalms, Hymns, and Prayers   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Dead Sea Scrolls

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008

...and, therefore, are not prayers. Songs of the Sage (4Q510–511). These are doxological hymns pronounced by a sage ( maskil ) “to frighten and terrify” evil spirits. This prophylactic function as well as the hymns' form and content, including the citation of Psalms 91 and naming of demons (related to the Fallen Angels of Gn. 6.1–4 ) qualify them as incantations. They are distinctive, however, (1) in their address to God rather than to the demons, (2) in their use of hymnic praise as words of power, (3) in their communal dimension as protection for all sons...

Memorialization and Religion in America

Memorialization and Religion in America   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Religion in America

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Religion
Length:
14,330 words

...ball game’s sporting and civic dimensions as indistinguishable from the central offense that its performance memorializes pre-Christian Apalachee chiefs named Ytonaslaq and Nicoguadca. Citing an Apalachee informant, de Paiva proclaims that “in his understanding, both are the names of demons, especially for Ytonaslaq.” De Paiva unites his ostensible concern for the players’ penchant for physical and spiritual violence in the memorial act of placing scalps at the foot of a pole that acts as a goalpost, which de Paiva later describes as “the ballpost of the devil.”...

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