Related Content

Show all results sharing this subject:

  • Literature

GO

Show Summary Details

Overview

Menippean satire


Quick Reference

A form of intellectually humorous work characterized by miscellaneous contents, displays of curious erudition, and comical discussions on philosophical topics. The name comes from the Greek Cynic philosopher Menippus (3rd century bce), whose works are lost, but who was imitated by the Roman writer Varro (1st century bce) among others. The Canadian critic Northrop Frye revived the term in Anatomy of Criticism (1957) while also introducing the overlapping term anatomy after a famous example of Menippean satire, Robert Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy (1621). The best‐known example of the form is Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865); other examples include the novels of Thomas Love Peacock, and John Barth's campus novelGiles Goat‐Boy (1966). The humour in these works is more cheerfully intellectual and less aggressive than in those works which we would usually call satires, although it holds up contemporary intellectual life to gentle ridicule.


Reference Entries

View all reference entries »