Show Summary Details

Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD REFERENCE (www.oxfordreference.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2013. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single entry from a reference work in OR for personal use (for details see Privacy Policy and Legal Notice).

Subscriber: null; date: 19 June 2018

Ibn Daud, Abraham ben David Hallevi

Source:
The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy
Author(s):

Simon Blackburn

Ibn Daud, Abraham ben David Hallevi (c.1110–80) The first Jewish Aristotelian, 

Ibn Daud was concerned, as Aquinas was in the following century, to reconcile philosophy with revealed religion. His principal work is The Exalted Faith, written in Arabic but only surviving in Hebrew translation. He espouses a rationalist but unorthodox set of views, that include limiting God's omniscience in order to make room for free will. He also celebrated the via negativa, or belief of negative theology, that God can only be described in terms of what he is not.