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Miró, Joan

Source:
The Oxford Companion to Western Art
Author(s):

Justine Hopkins

Miró, Joan 

(1893–1983).

Spanish painter. Miró was born and studied in Barcelona, where he met Picasso. From 1914 he practised as a painter; his early works, painted in strong hot colours, show some Cubist influence. In 1920 he moved to Paris and in 1925 took part in the First Surrealist Exhibition in the Galerie Pierre, Paris. However, whilst recognized as a distinguished member of the Surrealist group and sharing their interest in the unconscious, Miró retained his independence and his style remained distinctive. He ignored the hostility between Surrealism and abstraction, exploiting the tensions between them in delicate, tautly poised compositions which expressed the energies of life through rhythmically organized amoeboid forms, sometimes humorous, sometimes alarming, and always original and suggestive; much of his later work became increasingly abstract. He returned to Spain, in 1940, and began making ceramics which resulted in a number of public commissions, most notably Mur du soleil and Mur de la lune, for the Paris UNESCO building (1956). From 1966 he also worked in bronze. The Foundation Joan Miró, overlooking Barcelona, was opened in 1975 as a memorial museum and arts centre.

Justine Hopkins

Bibliography

Lanchner, C., Joan Miró (1993).Find this resource: