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peace establishment

The authorized size, composition, and organization of a nation's armed forces in peacetime.

Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)   Quick reference

Oxford Essential Quotations (6 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
1,673 words

...full tide of successful experiment, abandon a government which has so far kept us free and firm? first inaugural address, 4 March 1801 tide of successful experiment abandon a government so far kept us free Peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations—entangling alliances with none. first inaugural address, 4 March 1801 peace , commerce Peace, commerce friendship with all nations friendship with all nations entangling alliances with none Freedom of religion; freedom of the press, and freedom of person under the protection of habeas corpus ,...

Dalai Lama

Dalai Lama (1935– )   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Modern Quotations (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
159 words

...Dalai Lama 1935 –   Tibetan Buddhist , spiritual head of Tibetan Buddhism and, until the establishment of Chinese communist rule, the spiritual and temporal ruler of Tibet. The present Dalai Lama escaped to India in 1959 following the Chinese invasion of Tibet and was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989 Frankly speaking it is difficult to trust the Chinese. Once bitten by a snake you feel suspicious even when you see a piece of rope. attributed, 1981 trust the Chinese bitten by a snake see a piece of rope We are a part of humanity, so we...

Bill of Rights

Bill of Rights   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
517 words

...1 Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. The Bill of Rights: Amendment 2 A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed. The Bill of Rights: Amendment 3 No soldier shall, in time of peace be quartered in any house, without the...

Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
1,943 words

...abandon a government which has so far kept us free and firm? first inaugural address, 4 March 1801 honest patriot , in the full tide tide of successful experiment abandon a government so far kept us free Peace, commerce, and honest friendship with all nations—entangling alliances with none. first inaugural address, 4 March 1801 peace , commerce Peace, commerce friendship with all nations friendship with all nations entangling alliances with none Freedom of religion; freedom of the press, and freedom of person under the protection of habeas corpus ,...

Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Political Quotations (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
2,085 words

... Thomas Jefferson: A Chronology of His Thoughts (2002) so great advantage over another always cool and unruffled always cool and unruffled Banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies. letter to John Taylor, 28 May 1816, in T. Jefferson Randolph (ed.) Memoirs, Correspondence & Private Papers of T. Jefferson (1829) vol. 3 banking establishments are more dangerous Banking establishments are more dangerous But this momentous question [ the Missouri Compromise ] , like a firebell in the night awakened and filled me with terror. I...

Adam Smith

Adam Smith (1723–90)   Reference library

Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (8 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
799 words

...of the British empire cannot be made to contribute towards the support of the whole empire, it is surely time that Great Britain should free herself from the expense of defending those provinces in time of war, and of supporting any part of their civil or military establishments in time of peace, and endeavour to accommodate her future views and designs to the real mediocrity of her circumstances. Wealth of Nations (1776) bk. 5, ch. 3 provinces of the British empire Great Britain should free herself defending those provinces defending those provinces...

Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt (1858–1919)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
3,000 words

...for war is the surest guaranty for peace. Here Assistant Secretary of the Navy Roosevelt referred to Washington's advice that military preparedness helps to prevent wars. Roosevelt's speech called for “a great navy…an armament fit for the nation's needs, not primarily to fight, but to avert fighting.” The president, however, was less than sincere here. He was an enthusiastic warrior, some would say warmonger. Washington, on the other hand, while advocating preparedness, was suspicious of military establishments Washington's Forgotten Maxim , speech,...

George Washington

George Washington (1732–99)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
1,715 words

...War. Others have reacted similarly letter to his mother, May 3, 1754 To be prepared for war is one of the most effectual means of preserving peace. The president spoke to both houses of Congress—what has since come to be known as the annual State of the Union speech. Here Washington paraphrased part of a passage he admired from De rei militari , written in the fourth century by Vegetius: “He, therefore, who desires peace should prepare for war. He who aspires to victory should spare no pains to form his soldiers. And he who hopes for success should fight on...

(Sir) Winston Churchill

(Sir) Winston Churchill (18741965)   Reference library

Brewer's Famous Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
7,872 words

...Europe together with the major part of the Reich. An iron curtain would at once descend on this territory.’ These remarks were reprinted in British newspapers at the time. The Sinews of Peace . Churchill's speech at Fulton had this title – an allusion to the phrase ‘ nervi belli pecunia ’ from Cicero's Philippics where the ‘sinews of war’ meant ‘money’. The ‘sinews of peace’ recommended by Churchill in dealing with the Soviet Union amounted to recourse to the newly formed United Nations Organization. One is a majority. Any number of British parliamentarians...

Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
4,114 words

...measured by the hour die with the hour. letter to David Harding, April 20, 1824 Merchants love nobody. letter to John Langdon, 1785 The selfish spirit of commerce knows no country, and feels no passion or principle but that of gain. letter to Larkin Smith, 1809 Banking establishments are more dangerous than standing armies. letter to John Taylor, May 28, 1816 Subject opinion to coercion: whom will you make your inquisitors? Fallible men; governed by bad passions, by private as well as public reasons. Notes on the State of Virginia , 1781–85 When we get...

Harold Macmillan

Harold Macmillan (18941986)   Reference library

Brewer's Famous Quotations

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
2,709 words

...are three bodies no sensible man directly challenges: the Roman Catholic Church, the Brigade of Guards and the National Union of Mineworkers. Quoted in The Observer (22 February 1981). Compare Baldwin 8 . After a long life I have come to the conclusion that when all the establishment is united it is always wrong. Speech, Carlton Club (October 1982). Compare: ‘When a line of action is said to be supported “by all responsible men” it is nearly always dangerous or foolish’ – in his book The Past Masters (1975). [The sale of assets is common with...

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–82)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Quotations (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Quotation
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Quotations
Length:
4,741 words

...conservatism goes for comfort, reform for truth. The Conservative , lecture, Boston, May 9, 1841 A party is perpetually corrupted by personality. Politics , in Essays: Second Series , 1844 There are always two parties, the party of the past and the party of the future: the establishment and the movement. Historic Notes of Life and Letters in New England , 1867 Poverty demoralizes. Wealth , in The Conduct of Life , 1860 Power ceases in the instant of repose. Self-Reliance , in Essays: First Series , 1841 You shall have joy, or you shall have power, said God;...

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