You are looking at 1-20 of 22 entries  for:

  • All : first point of Libra x
clear all

View:

Overview

first point of Libra

(≏) The point on the celestial sphere diametrically opposite the first point of Aries. It is the same as the autumnal equinox. It has right ascension 12h and declination zero. It is the ...

first point of Libra

first point of Libra   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Astronomy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... point of Libra ( symbol ♎ ) The point on the celestial sphere diametrically opposite the first point of Aries . It is the same as the autumnal equinox. It has right ascension 12h and declination zero. It is the point at which the Sun passes from north to south of the celestial equator, which happens on September 22 or 23 each year. Because of precession , it no longer lies in Libra but in neighbouring...

first point of Libra

first point of Libra  

(≏) The point on the celestial sphere diametrically opposite the first point of Aries. It is the same as the autumnal equinox. It has right ascension 12h and declination zero. It is the point at ...
hed

hed   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...) heed , heved , head . In A Treatise on the Astrolabe and Equatorie of the Planetis , the word denotes the first degree or beginning of the sign (L. caput Arietis , etc.) . It is used in practice of only four signs, but that is because they are of special importance. The four are Aries, Cancer, Libra, and Capricorn. The Sun's entering those signs marks the commencement of the four seasons, spring, summer, autumn, and winter. The head of Aries is the reference point from which longitudes are measured along the ecliptic . ( See also months and...

ecliptic

ecliptic   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
122 words
Illustration(s):
1

...the Greek ekleipsis , disappearance, the apparent path of the sun among the stars which is a great circle inclined to the celestial equator at an angle of about 23° 27′. It is so named because, for an eclipse of the sun or moon to occur, the moon must lie on or near the ecliptic. It intersects the celestial equator, or equinoctial , twice during the year at the equinoxes; on 21 March at the ‘first point of Aries’, which is 0° Right Ascension, and on 23 September at the ‘first point of Libra’, at 180° Right Ascension, and is furthest from the equator...

equinox

equinox   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Astronomy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... Either of the two points at which the Sun’s apparent yearly path (the ecliptic) intersects the celestial equator; or the dates on which this occurs—on March 20 ( vernal equinox ) and September 22 or 23 ( autumnal equinox ). These points are also known as the first point of Aries and the first point of Libra . When the term ‘equinox’ is used without qualification, the vernal (spring) equinox is meant. Around the time of the equinoxes, night and day are equal in length the world over. The equinox is not a fixed point, but moves because of precession ...

right ascension

right ascension   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Weights, Measures, and Units

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...the segment of the sky from 0 to 2 h (0 to 30°), Taurus from 2 to 4 h (30 to 60°), et seq. through Gemini, Cancer, Leo, Virgo, Libra, Scorpio, Sagittarius, Capricorn, and Aquarius to Pisces at 22 to 24 h (330 to 360°). Greenwich Hour Angle ( GHA ) is a similar concept to right ascension, being the west longitude (0° to 360°) of the point directly below the celestial body at any instant. Since the GHA of any body equals the GHA of the First Point of Aries plus (360° minus RA of the body), the latter referred to as the Sidereal Hour Angle ( SHA ) of the body,...

zodiac

zodiac   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Weights, Measures, and Units

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...band of our sky within which the Sun and its other planets appear to travel, divided traditionally into twelve equal-sized segments named sequentially Aries, Taurus, Gemini, Cancer, Leo, Virgo, Libra, Scorpio, Sagittarius, Capricorn, Aquarius, and Pisces. However, while each of these is classically the name of a specific star pattern, still used, along with 76 outside this band, as one of the variously sized polygons (‘constellations’) into which the heavens are fixedly divided, they have a distinct meaning for the zodiac. The apparent annular path of the Sun...

algebra

algebra   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Renaissance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early Modern History (1500 to 1700)
Length:
1,004 words

...‘radix’, first appear in the work of Michael Stiefel ( 1544 ). The equals sign (=), apparently derived from the symbol for the zodiac sign Libra (the Balance), first appears in the work of Robert Recorde . However, algebra books, being written in the vernacular, had only local circulation, so such symbols were not adopted either universally or rapidly. Viète was the first to use notation to distinguish between the unknown and given quantities: he used vowels for the former and consonants for the latter; Descartes ( 1637 ) introduced the use of letters from...

astrology

astrology   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
1,735 words

...had allowed himself too much leeway of interpretation. Gauquelin's book, Songes et mensonges de l'astrologie ( 1969 ), was a scathing attack on astrology, as its title (Dreams and Delusions of Astrology) indicates. Yet the unsatisfactoriness of Krafft's experimental method led Gauquelin to devise a few simple tests of his own. He concentrated his analysis on two straightforward questions. The first was whether astrologers are correct in stating that people born under ‘odd’ signs of the zodiac—Aries, Gemini, Leo, Libra, Sagittarius, Aquarius—tend to be...

astrology

astrology   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
1,535 words
Illustration(s):
1

...world, in the field of the interpretation of major natural, political or religious events: hypothetical tempests of 1186 , linked to the presence of all the planets in the sign of Libra; Black Death of 1348 and Great Schism of 1378 , interpreted after the event as the consequences of the conjuctions of 1345 and 1365 , etc. As for comets, they usually foretold catastrophes, notably the coming death of some king or prince, and had done so since the early Middle Ages. Medieval astrology was thus never reduced to a set of techniques of prediction. It was...

Anglicanism

Anglicanism   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Reformation

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Religion
Length:
5,589 words

...of the formation of Anglicanism in the sixteenth century. Neill, Stephen . Anglicanism . 3d rev. ed. London, 1977. Most widely read modern study of the subject. First six chapters present historical review through the seventeenth century. Sykes, Stephen W. The Integrity of Anglicanism . London, 1978. This book marks a turning point in the discussion of Anglicanism. Most important. Wolf, William J. Anglican Spirituality . Wilton, Conn., 1982. Essays, mostly historical, by various scholars on a subject of growing importance in the discussion of...

Literature

Literature   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to United States History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
8,101 words

...Nest ( 1962 ); Thomas Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49 ( 1966 ); Diane Johnson's The Shadow Knows ( 1974 ); and Don DeLillo's White Noise ( 1985 ), The Names ( 1989 ), and Libra ( 1991 ). The satiric and revisionary impulse extended to the literary medium itself in the novels of Donald Barthelme , John Barth , William Gass , and Robert Coover ; and to historical fiction in Pynchon's V. ( 1963 ) and Gravity's Rainbow ( 1973 ), Styron's Confessions of Nat Turner ( 1967 ), E.L. Doctorow's Book of Daniel ( 1971 ), and Robert Coover's The...

Literature

Literature   Reference library

Everett Emerson, Gary Ashwill, Gordon Hutner, Thomas H. Schaub, and Erin A. Smith

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Cultural and Intellectual History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...of Lot 49 ( 1966 ); Diane Johnson's The Shadow Knows ( 1974 ); and Don DeLillo's White Noise ( 1985 ), The Names ( 1989 ), and Libra ( 1991 ). The satiric and revisionary impulse extended to the literary medium itself in the novels of Donald Barthelme, John Barth, William Gass, and Robert Coover; to historical fiction in Pynchon's V. ( 1963 ) and Gravity's Rainbow ( 1973 ), Styron's Confessions of Nat Turner ( 1967 ), E. L. Doctorow's Book of Daniel ( 1971 ), and Robert Coover's The Public Burning ( 1977 ); and to the New Journalism of...

science in history

science in history   Reference library

Science, Technology, and Society

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...México published Libra astronómica y filosófica , considered one of the most important works of Latin American science, in which he refuted prevailing astrological arguments about comets. In Brazil the same tone of reflections can be found in the works of Valentin Stancel, a Jesuit mathematician from Prague who lived in Brazil from 1663 until his death in 1705 . In the Viceroyalty of Peru, the first to be recognized as a mathematician is Francisco Ruiz Lozano ( 1607–1677 ), who wrote Tratado de los cometas , essentially a treatise of medieval...

Metals

Metals   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
17,951 words
Illustration(s):
5

...Cast ingots of gold, silver, iron, or copper further represent a type of metal artifact. They were traded extensively throughout the ancient Near East and provided the metalworker with the core material from which to manufacture objects. A Roman cast-gold bar with Latin stamps originates from Abukir (Egypt). Persian-period bronze, cube-shaped, as well as zoomorphic weights (e.g., ram, donkey, calf) are known from Ashkelon (Israel). Weights from the Roman East include a rectangular example with beveled edges used with a scalepan balance (Lat., libra ) and a...

Bley Paul

Bley Paul   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Popular Music (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Music
Length:
1,416 words

...of his instincts as a talent scout alone. The legendary Ornette Coleman Quartet (with Don Cherry , Charlie Haden and Billy Higgins ) made its earliest impact as four-fifths of Bley’s quintet. He encouraged the emergence of wife Carla Bley and Annette Peacock as composers, building his repertoire in the 60s and 70s around their tunes. He had Pat Metheny and Jaco Pastorius in his band when both were callow youths, and was the first to record them. All of this, however, is of less significance than Bley’s own music, the earliest examples of which...

Livy

Livy   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
687 words

...books, and it is just there that we find the greatest concentration of non‐Ciceronian usages, e.g. in the story of the Bacchanalia in book 39 or the account of the death of Cicero preserved by Seneca the Younger . Livy was a patriotic writer, though in narrative he never refers to Roman troops as ‘our men’, ‘our army’, and often, writing from their opponents' point of view, talks of the Romans as ‘enemy’. His aim was to chronicle the rise of Rome to mastery first of Italy, then of the rest of the Mediterranean world, and to highlight the virtues which...

Macedo,                 Francisco

Macedo, Francisco (1596–1681)   Reference library

Emanuele Colombo

The Oxford Guide to the Historical Reception of Augustine

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion
Length:
1,247 words

...a single point of view: that of Aug., to which scholastic theology ought to return. Evaluation In response to the accusation of Jansenism, brought against him by contemporary adversaries, M. replied that he had developed his interpretation of Aug.'s teachings long before reading the Augustinus . The presence of some agreements between the most radical forms of ...

Sundials

Sundials   Reference library

Atilla Bir and Mustafa Kaçar

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Science, and Technology in Islam

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Religion, Science and technology
Length:
1,108 words
Illustration(s):
3

...The stick shadow falls in this limited area, which is cast in two parts by the 21 March Aries and 23 June Libra equinox line. The stick shadow falls in winter on the upper part and in summer on the lower part of this line. One reading on the noon line’s upper end is given in the numerical mnemonic formula 7:31, then the numerals 7, 6, 5, and on the lower end again in numerical mnemonic letters as the time 4:29. Due to the position, these are the noon times on which the wall becomes illuminated during the afternoon by the shining sunlight. Thus the summer-winter...

money and coinage

money and coinage   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
2,496 words

...At a value of about one day’s unskilled labour, the penny could support all but the smallest retail exchanges. Sales of land and other large transactions would have involved relatively large numbers of coins, but do not appear to have been prohibitively cumbersome. The coins were accounted in a system introduced by Charlemagne, in which 12 pennies were called by the old coin name ‘solidus’ ( shilling , sou , soldo ) and 240 pennies were given the name of the weight unit libra (pound, livre , libbra) . These terms were just units of account; only the...

View: