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establishment of the port

Subject: History

The interval between the time of meridian passage of the new or the full moon and the time of the following high tide. This interval which is constant for a given port is also known as the ...

establishment of the port

establishment of the port   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
166 words

... of the port , the interval between the time of meridian passage of the new or the full moon and the time of the following high tide . This interval which is constant for a given port is also known as the High Water Full and Change constant (HWF & C). The average interval is known as the mean high water lunitidal interval. Because the tides are governed largely by the moon, and because the time of meridian passage of the moon is later each day by about 50 minutes, it follows that, if the age of the moon and the establishment of the port are...

establishment of the port

establishment of the port  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The interval between the time of meridian passage of the new or the full moon and the time of the following high tide. This interval which is constant for a given port is also known as the High Water ...
Central Government, Courts, and Taxation

Central Government, Courts, and Taxation   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Family and Local History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
7,750 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...instance enclosure from 1516 to 1517 and episodes of dearth and plague , through printed books of instructions to magistrates, and exhibited an interest in the provision of poor relief, which developed fitfully until the comprehensive statute of 1598 . The implementation of these policies required an activist and committed magistracy, many of whom had a pessimistic view of their age and saw the repression of the †poor and indigent as a necessary step towards the establishment of a purer society (the set of attitudes we loosely call puritan). These policies...

Towns

Towns   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Family and Local History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,095 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...was considerably aided by the spread of brick and tile construction, which at last brought to an end the perennial danger of major fires. The usual view is that these major changes were not matched by appropriate improvements in urban government, and it is true that the state in 1688 restored the old pattern of chartered and unchartered towns in all their variety, and that no major changes were made until the 19th century. However, piecemeal improvements under Acts of Parliament were numerous, especially in the establishment of improvement commissions ...

Industrialization

Industrialization   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,380 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...what has been called the trend ‘towards earlier and more universal marriage’. Economic opportunity in a growing economy may provide the key to resolving the ‘conundrum’ of increasing marriage, higher birth rates, and the rapid acceleration of population growth from the late eighteenth century. But economic growth was by no means exclusively or even primarily industrial growth. Much of it was commercial expansion based in the capital, in the burgeoning ports, and in the prospering centres of consumption, leisure, and civic life in the provincial capitals and...

Place-Names

Place-Names   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Family and Local History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,692 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the existence of chieftains such as Port from place‐names like Portsmouth which do not contain personal names, and assigned to them roles in the conquest of southern Britain. In early times in Ireland, place‐name lore, or dinnseanchas , was a recognized branch of learning, but it was related to literature rather than to history, and it consisted of highly fanciful etymologies. In early medieval society there was probably so great a gap between the preoccupations of learned men and those of the peasant farmers among whom place‐names arose that the...

22 The History of the Book in France

22 The History of the Book in France   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
10,032 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...implications in the publishing world was the Jansenist crisis, which began in 1643 when Arnauld and his Port-Royal allies protested against the papal condemnation of Jansen’s Augustinus , attacking the Jesuits in return. Not only did the ensuing conflict lead to a vast number of publications, largely unauthorized, on both sides, it also destabilized the Parisian printing establishment. The paradoxes of this period are typified by the fact that Pascal’s publisher, Guillaume Desprez, went to the Bastille for printing the immensely successful ...

42 The History of the Book in Japan

42 The History of the Book in Japan   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
8,089 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
4

...appending notices at the end of their publications listing other books they had for sale, indicating a growing awareness of the market. By the late 17 th century, there were the beginnings of a booksellers’ guild in existence in Kyoto, but it was not recognized by the authorities until 1716 . This was followed by the acknowledgement of similar guilds in Osaka in 1723 and Edo in 1725 ; the only provincial guild was that of Nagoya, which was recognized in 1798 . The shogunal government was not enthusiastic about the establishment of trade guilds, but...

47 The History of the Book in Canada

47 The History of the Book in Canada   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
5,120 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Illustration(s):
1

...in 1948 competed with some 3,000 from Britain and the US. In addition to funding for media and the arts, they recommended scholarships and aid to universities, and chided the government about the absence of a national library. A key recommendation was the establishment of an arts funding board, the *Canada Council , created in 1957 . Together with the *Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada ( 1978 ), it continues to play a central role in support of authors and publishers. The National Library, now *Library and Archives Canada ,...

21 The History of the Book in Ireland

21 The History of the Book in Ireland   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
3,994 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...The consequent increase in the domestic market for consumer goods, along with the growth in *literacy , created a network of distributors and customers for the book trade. This trend was reinforced by a long period of political stability, in contrast to the wars of the 17 th century. The Dublin book trade expanded continually throughout the 18 th century; and while the capital retained its overwhelming dominance in book production, the century also saw the establishment of printers and booksellers in provincial towns. Whereas in the 1690s ...

Encounter, HMAS

Encounter, HMAS  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Located in Port Adelaide, South Australia, is a Naval and Reserve Training Establishment. It provides naval representation and coordination of naval tasks in South Australia, and is the headquarters ...
Guandong Army

Guandong Army  

The Japanese army in Manchuria which came into being after the Russo-Japanese War, when Japan had assumed control over the southern tip of the Liaotung peninsula (including Port Arthur), which it ...
Hampshire

Hampshire  

Was essentially the hinterland of the great port of Southampton from which it took its name, plus the Isle of Wight. At the time of the Roman occupation, the region was inhabited by the Regni in the ...
Design Council

Design Council  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(established 1944)Originally founded as the Council of Industrial Design (COID) under the British Board of Trade in 1944, this body was perhaps the world's most influential state‐funded design ...
nautical almanac

nautical almanac  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A periodical publication of astronomical and other, primarily ephemeral, information intended for the navigator and nautical astronomer. The earliest nautical almanac was the Connoissance des temps ...
naval architecture

naval architecture  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The science of designing ships, submarines, floating docks, yachts, oil rigs for the offshore oil and gas industry, and any craft for use on water. Those qualified to work in this area are known as ...
Piraeus

Piraeus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The great harbour complex of Athens, is a rocky limestone peninsula some 7 km. (4–5 mi.) SW of Athens, which Themistocles began to fortify in 493/2 as a base for Athens' rapidly expanding fleet in ...
Cornwall

Cornwall  

The oldest of English duchies (from 1337, though first a Norman earldom c.1140) has dimensions other than its peninsularity: the south‐flowing Tamar forms the county boundary with Devon. As the ...
George III

George III  

King of Great Britain and Ireland, b. 24 May 1738, s. of Frederick, prince of Wales, and Augusta; acc. 25 Oct. 1760; m. Charlotte, da. of Karl Ludwig, duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, 8 Sept. 1761; ...
lunitidal interval

lunitidal interval   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Astronomy (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...interval The time between the transit of the Moon across the local meridian and the time of the next high tide; also known as the high water interval ( HWI ) or establishment of the port...

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