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a fortiori argument

a fortiori argument   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Construction, Surveying and Civil Engineering

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

... fortiori argument Latin term used in law to show that the case being presented falls well within the scope of something that has gone before, thus there is even greater reason that the situation under examination should be treated with at least the same consideration. The situation can be treated as a maiore ad minus e.g. if the situation applies to a large group then it should also hold true for a smaller group or if 8 m 3 of concrete is contained in a dumper then 6 m 3 would also fit into the same dumper. Alternatively, but less common, a minor ad...

topos

topos  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A standard form of rhetorical argumentation or a variably expressible literary commonplace. In classical rhetoric, inventio helps the orator to find elements of persuasion: topoi or locī are both the ...
a fortiori

a fortiori   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
392 words

...28. (The argument is by greater force of logic, according to this writer, because if a person can take another life, surely one can take one's own.) • “Indeed, human bloodshed even by an animal must be avenged, and, a fortiori , bloodshed by a man's own brother—a clear reference to Cain and Abel.” Leon R. Kass , “A Genealogy of Justice,” Commentary , July 1996 , at 44. (The argument is by greater force of logic because human bloodshed by a brother is more reprehensible.) The phrase is used illogically when the proposition following a fortiori is no...

topos

topos   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
102 words

... topoi include arguments ad hominem or ā fortiōrī , from etymology , from antecedents or effects. See communes loci ; progymnasmata...

topos

topos   Reference library

Glenn W. Most and Gian Biagio Conte

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
450 words

...two rhetoricians provide the same catalogue, but some of the more familiar τόποι include arguments ad hominem or a fortiori , from homonymy or etymology , from antecedents or effects. Although in this sense the ancient discussions remain important for contemporary analyses of everyday argumentation, the general decline of rhetoric in modern culture has led topoi, like other rhetorical concepts, to seek refuge in literary studies. The recent critical topos of applying the term also, and especially, to commonly but variably expressed literary contents (clichéd...

topos

topos   Reference library

Glenn W. Most and Gian Biagio Conte

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
430 words

...two rhetoricians provide the same catalogue, but some of the more familiar topoi include arguments ad hominem or a fortiori , from homonymy or etymology, from antecedents or effects. Although in this sense the ancient discussions remain important for contemporary analyses of everyday argumentation, the general decline of rhetoric in modern culture has led topoi , like other rhetorical concepts, to seek refuge in literary studies. The recent critical topos of applying the term also, and especially, to commonly but variably expressed literary contents...

process philosophy

process philosophy   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Philosophy (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
354 words

...then there really is no change and a fortiori no true process philosophy. However, at least prima facie, change is a pervasive feature of what is, and many things that are may be described without contradiction as processes. Mr Stephen Priest See also neutral monism . Aristotle , Physics , books 1 and 2, tr. William Charlton (Oxford, 1970). Aristotle , Physics , books 3 and 4, tr. Edward Hussey (Oxford, 1983). Jonathan Barnes (ed.), Early Greek Philosophy (London, 1987). Plato , Theaetetus , tr. John McDowell (Oxford, 1973). Alfred North...

Tacit Dimension, the

Tacit Dimension, the   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Rhetoric

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
2,064 words

...use of “topics” unfortunately misleads us. In English, a fortiori , a sense of more-and-less simultaneously, is a topic. The mode of thought that arises from an abstract understanding of the concept leads to, but is not itself, the active thought necessary to products: premise, enthymeme, argument, speech. What is expressed above will be controversial among rhetoricians, and the controversy itself indicates a constant struggle toward more complete understanding, either individually or collectively; such a struggle will, if attended to, constantly reveal...

Stockdale, Percival

Stockdale, Percival (1736–1811)   Reference library

The Continuum Encyclopedia of British Philosophy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
846 words

...being; and if it is not innocently or laudably employed, it will find for itself some trifling or bad employment.’ The way to avoid falling into evil ways is to keep busy with projects. For Stockdale, the old proverb that idle hands are the devil's workshop is true a fortiori where the mind is concerned. In 1783 , in his Essay on Misanthropy , he asserted that ‘the true philosopher … knows that the almost infinite majority of mankind, are wicked, and mischievous.’ And in his memoirs, he improved on this view to say that he thought from his ‘experience of...

Ecclesiology

Ecclesiology   Reference library

Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
1,293 words

... treatises , attentive to the historical fact of the succession to the apostolic see. Within a Church thus enlarged to the dimensions of Christendom , papal authority , from being purely spiritual, gradually became a power of legal or even political authority, which was a major ecclesiological turning-point: the relations between the Churches and that of Rome , a fortiori with the laity , was one of subordination, which theologians expressed with a copious supply of organic or organicist metaphors, or by evoking father-son relations, etc. Gregory...

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