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Second Sophistic

Is a term applied to the period c. ad 60–230 when declamation became the most prestigious literary activity in the Greek world. Philostratus coined the term in his Lives of the Sophists, ...

Second Sophistic

Second Sophistic   Reference library

Ruth Webb

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

... philosophy shown by some individuals who practised and taught both. The impact of the Second Sophistic can also been seen in productions other than the rhetorical displays described in the Lives . The novels by Longus, Achilles Tatius, and Heliodorus are recognizably products of the Second Sophistic in their language, in their use of rhetorical techniques, and, more broadly, in their exploration of fiction. Several of the defining characteristics of the Second Sophistic were not unique to the imperial period: declamation and the use of classical Attic...

Second Sophistic

Second Sophistic   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
2,627 words

... Sophistic The slippery term “the Second Sophistic” is usually taken to denote the culture of rhetorical performance that flourished in the eastern parts of the early Roman Empire about 100–300 ce ; or, by extension, to denote the classicizing revival of Greek literature and art that accompanied it; or sometimes to denote simply the period of Greek history itself. Coined perhaps by Flavius Philostratus ( c.170–c.250 ce ) in his Lives of the Sophists ( 481 , 507 ), the term “Second Sophistic” seems at first sight to have ancient authority, unlike other...

Second Sophistic

Second Sophistic   Reference library

Ewen Lyall Bowie

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,457 words

...limited terms) political recovery in the Greek world that has fairly been termed a renaissance and is even (loosely) called the Second Sophistic. What was uttered and done by rhetors in this period breathed more confidence and had a wider impact than what went before, and they themselves were prominent among the many elements of Greek culture that found a high place in Roman esteem and society. G. Anderson , The Second Sophistic (1993); D. A. Russell , Greek Declamation (1983) and (ed.), Antonine Literature (1990); G. W. Bowersock , Greek Sophists in...

Second Sophistic

Second Sophistic   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Classical Literature (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Classical studies
Length:
321 words

... Sophistic The term applied to the period, roughly ad 60–230 , in the Greek-speaking parts of the Roman empire when declamation became a leading literary activity and its highly-skilled practitioners famous. The name was coined by Philostratus (1) in his Lives of the Sophists (second to third century ad), claiming a link with the Greek sophists of the first sophistic age, the late fifth and fourth centuries bc. ‘Sophists’ was the title given to these latter-day practitioners, who at this time were professional rhetors or orators who gave...

Second Sophistic

Second Sophistic   Reference library

Ewen Lyall Bowie

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,308 words

...not attested as sophists, whose works’ manner and style would surely have been different had they not lived in the Second Sophistic—the periegete Pausanias , the historian Herodian. It is clear, however, that the prominence of declamatory rhetoric was not limited to Philostratus’ favoured period. It continued as a major cultural phenomenon, little abated by the 3rd-cent. crisis, into the 4th and 5th cents., whose properly sophistic texts are more voluminous than those surviving from ad 60–230 . We also already find rhetors active in Greek city...

Second Sophistic

Second Sophistic   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
309 words

... Sophistic (δευτέρα σοφιστική), term introduced by Philostratos (ca. 200 ) to designate the branch of rhetoric that emphasized social and political aspects of life rather than morals and philosophy ( Opera , ed. C.L. Kayser [Leipzig 1871 ; rp. Hildesheim 1964 ] 2:2f). The term Second Sophistic is now applied to a literary movement of the 2nd–6th C. closely connected with the cultural activity of urban intellectuals. From the 4th C. onward, sophists such as Themistios were esp. concerned with preserving or even restoring ancient virtues. Unlike...

Second Sophistic

Second Sophistic   Quick reference

Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
716 words

... Sophistic is a term applied to the period c. ad 60–230 when declamation became the most prestigious literary activity in the Greek world. Philostratus coined the term in his Lives of the Sophists , claiming a link between the classical sophists and the movement whose first member he identified as Nicetes of Smyrna in the reign of Nero . The term ‘sophist’ seems restricted to rhetors who entered upon a career of public displays. On the evidence of Philostratus, whose 40 lives of imperial sophists include several Severan contemporaries, and of...

Second Sophistic

Second Sophistic  

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Overview Page
Is a term applied to the period c. ad 60–230 when declamation became the most prestigious literary activity in the Greek world. Philostratus coined the term in his Lives of the Sophists, claiming a ...
Adrianus (Hadrianus)

Adrianus (Hadrianus)  

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Overview Page
Of Tyre (c. ad 113–93), sophist, pupil of Herodes Atticus; held the chairs of rhetoric at Athens and Rome. One short declamation attributed to him survives. See Second Sophistic.Philostratus ...
Archaism

Archaism  

Or classicism, was a current in highstyle Byz. literature inherited from the Second Sophistic, where it originated. It encompassed both language and style (rhetorical figures, etc.) and the contents ...

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