You are looking at 1-11 of 11 entries  for:

  • All : Psota, Ivo Váňa x
clear all

View:

Overview

Ivo Váňa Psota

(also known as Vania Psota; born 1 May 1908 in Kiev, Ukraine, died 16 February 1952 in Brno, Czechoslovakia), Czech dancer, choreographer, and pedagogue. Psota, who used the ...

Psota, Ivo Váňa

Psota, Ivo Váňa (1 May 1908)   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
791 words

..., Ivo Váňa (also known as Vania Psota; born 1 May 1908 in Kiev, Ukraine , died 16 February 1952 in Brno, Czechoslovakia), Czech dancer, choreographer, and pedagogue. Psota, who used the name Vania Psota when performing abroad, inherited his gift for dance from his mother, who had been a solo performer and later opened her own school. In the years 1919–1923 he studied at the Prague ballet school of Augustin Berger . In 1924 Psota was engaged by the Prague National Theater, and after 1926 he became a soloist and from 1928 on the director of the...

Ivo Váňa Psota

Ivo Váňa Psota  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(also known as Vania Psota; born 1 May 1908 in Kiev, Ukraine, died 16 February 1952 in Brno, Czechoslovakia), Czech dancer, choreographer, and pedagogue. Psota, who used the name Vania ...
Brno Ballet

Brno Ballet   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
456 words

...in Czechoslovakia, The Red Poppy , in 1935 . This progressive policy did not change even after Ivo Váňa Psota , who had been a soloist and between 1928 and 1932 director of the company, returned in 1936 as director and choreographer, having in the interim been a member of the Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo. Psota's chef-d'oeuvre was the world premiere of Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet in 1938 ; Psota and Zora Šemberová danced the title roles. Psota immigrated to the United States in 1941 , but he returned in 1947 and within a short time had...

Kůra, Miroslav

Kůra, Miroslav (26 May 1929)   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
675 words

...Miroslav (born 26 May 1929 in Brno, Czechoslovakia), Czech dancer and choreographer. After being introduced to ballet by his older brother Gustav , Kůra obtained his dance basics in Brno ( 1939–1941 ) at the school of Ivo Váňa Psota , who also became his first ballet director. Kůra was also engaged at Katowice ( 1941–1943 ) and Nuremberg ( 1943–1944 ). After World War II he performed in Brno ( 1945–1946 ), in Bratislava ( 1946–1948 ), and again in Brno ( 1948–1949 ); Saša Machov then lured him to the National Theater in Prague ( 1949–1951 ). After...

Berger, Augustin

Berger, Augustin (11 August 1861)   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
514 words

...Theater he performed 1,873 times. Among his partners were Giulietta Paltrinieri, Enriquetta Grimaldi , and Luigia Cerale . Berger was a demanding and strict teacher who trained several notable dancers, among them Anna Korecká , the first Czech prima ballerina , and Ivo Váňa Psota . Berger also had an important influence on the development of Czech ballet. He made the dancers of the Prague National Theater into a unified, disciplined, highly professional company, and his work as a choreographer and librettist inspired the creation of national ballets,...

Němeček, Jiří

Němeček, Jiří (12 April 1924)   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
638 words

...Theater, and during the 1943–1944 season he was a soloist in Wrocław, Poland. After World War II, from 1945 to 1948 , Němeček was again a soloist, this time in Opava, where he was named director of ballet in 1946 . Over the course of his next engagement, in Brno under Ivo Váňa Psota from 1948 to 1951 , Němeček polished his craft and gained professional rigor and discipline. From 1951 to 1957 he fully developed as a choreographer in Pilsen, where under his leadership a young, ambitious, and homogenous company soon was formed. Even though it was at...

Romeo and Juliet

Romeo and Juliet   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
3,926 words

...choreography not by Lavrovsky but by Ivo Váňa Psota . [See the entry on Prokofiev .] Psota Version Czech title: Romeo a Julie: Devet Tanechnich Scen o Velike Lasce (Dance Pictures on a Great Love). Ballet in nine scenes with a prologue and an epilogue. Choreography: Váňa Psota. Music: Sergei Prokofiev; Suites 1 and 2 from a score for an unrealized ballet, Romeo and Juliet . Scenery and costumes: Václav Skrušny . First performance: 30 December 1938 , Brno State Theater for Opera and Ballet. Principals: Váňa Psota (Romeo), Zora Šemberová (Juliet), Jan...

Prokofiev, Sergei

Prokofiev, Sergei (23 April)   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
2,632 words

...were later added to the score. The orchestra, too, was perplexed by the music and passed a resolution, two weeks before the opening, demanding that it be canceled in order to avoid a scandal. By this time, a separate production in Brno, Czechoslovakia, choreographed by Ivo Váňa Psota and presented on 30 December 1938 , had robbed the Kirov of the prestige of a premiere. However, the ballet opened in Leningrad on 11 January 1940 and was a triumphant success. It has remained in the Russian repertory ever since, and the score is regularly used by...

Czech Republic and Slovak Republic

Czech Republic and Slovak Republic   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
7,043 words

...troupe Jenčík's Girls was featured in the late 1920s at the Cabaret Lucerna and at the Liberated Theater of Jiří Voskovec and Jan Werich . Jenčík, widely known as “Joe,” also choreographed large dance events for workers' sports and gymnastics festivals. Saša Machov and Ivo Váňa Psota were among the younger choreographers who began to work in this period. In the 1920s and 1930s interest in a wide range of modern styles grew, influenced mostly by Émile Jaques-Dalcroze but also by Rudolf Laban and Isadora Duncan . The most prominent representatives of...

Ballets Russes De Monte Carlo

Ballets Russes De Monte Carlo   Reference library

The International Encyclopedia of Dance

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Performing arts, Dance, Music
Length:
4,114 words

...departed, including Grigorieva in 1944 and Leskova in 1945 , both to settle in South America, as had Verchinina. Few important new ballets were produced because of insufficient funds and the lack of a major resident choreographer. Those staged were primarily by Ivo Váňa Psota , a Czech character dancer who had been with de Basil from 1932 to 1937 and then again in 1941 . They consisted mainly of minor tributes to individual localities and had little merit. The large standard repertory of de Basil's company was novel to South American audiences,...

ballet

ballet   Reference library

Alan Brissenden

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
948 words
Illustration(s):
1

... 2008 ) won praise. Of all the plays, Romeo and Juliet has inspired by far the most ballets. Most have used Sergei Prokofiev ’s score, commissioned for Moscow’s Bolshoi Theatre in 1935 but rejected as ‘undanceable’; the first ballet to Prokofiev was by Czechoslovakian Ivo Vana-Psota (Brno, 1938 ). The first Russian version was Leonid Lavrovsky ’s (Leningrad, 1940 ). Others using the same music include Ashton (Copenhagen, 1955 ), Cranko (Venice, 1958 ), Kenneth Macmillan (London, 1965 ), Nureyev (London, 1977 ), and Seregi (Budapest, ...

View: