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Michelangelo phenomenon

A pattern of relationship interdependence in which close partners influence each other's dispositions, values, and behavioural patterns in such a manner as to bring both people closer to ...

Michelangelo phenomenon

Michelangelo phenomenon n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... phenomenon n. A pattern of relationship interdependence in which close partners influence each other’s dispositions, values, and behavioural patterns in such a manner as to bring both people closer to their ideal selves . The concept was introduced by the US psychologist Stephen Michael Drigotas (born 1966 ) and several collaborators in an article in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology in 1999 reporting the results of four experiments designed to elucidate the phenomenon. [Named after the Italian sculptor Michelangelo...

Michelangelo phenomenon

Michelangelo phenomenon  

A pattern of relationship interdependence in which close partners influence each other's dispositions, values, and behavioural patterns in such a manner as to bring both people closer to their ideal ...
Arte Povera

Arte Povera   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
87 words

...such as cement, twigs, or newspapers, in deliberate contrast to traditional sculptural materials such as stone and metal. Its often metaphorical imagery was taken from nature, history, or contemporary life. Arte Povera was a phenomenon of the later 1960s and 1970s and is primarily associated with artists such as Michelangelo Pistoletto and Giulio Paolini , though it can also accurately be applied to non-Italian figures such as Joseph Beuys...

Mannerism

Mannerism   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Christian Art & Architecture (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
2,314 words

...‘rules’ of the classical tradition, artistic virtuosity takes on a new level of importance. Early evidence of the application of maniera to art can be seen in Giorgio Vasari ’s Vite ( 1550 ), where the author uses the word to describe the work of Michelangelo. While clearly intended to convey Michelangelo’s extraordinary virtuosity and ingenuity, Vasari’s choice of terminology may also imply the potential dangers of individual artistic licence, especially for artists like himself endowed with lesser talents. The question of the unclassical nature of...

Mannerism

Mannerism   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Western Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
1,516 words

...providing explanations for the changes he observed. Dvořák ( 1921 ) identified in the elongated forms and unreal spatial structures of El Greco , Tintoretto , and the late Michelangelo a spiritual inwardness which was quite distinct from the confident materialism of the Renaissance. This for him constituted Mannerism; it was a European rather than simply an Italian phenomenon. He interpreted it as a response to a crisis that had religious, political, and intellectual dimensions, when old certainties disappeared after the Renaissance and the Protestant...

Renaissance

Renaissance   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Western Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
3,836 words

...era of Mannerism . It was not exclusively an Italian phenomenon or under Italian influence—the ‘ Antwerp Mannerists ’ are quite reasonably so called—and it is difficult to define, partly because, like the term Renaissance itself, it is meant to circumscribe a period, designate a style, and represent certain values, all at once. Venice , too, felt the pull of High Renaissance Rome, Sebastiano del Piombo emigrating to the household of the papal banker Agostino Chigi , a lasting association with Michelangelo, and eventually the curia. Titian, merging all the...

Gay Aesthetics

Gay Aesthetics   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
3,656 words

...The image of Michelangelo's David , for instance—reproduced as signage for commerical establishments and as plaster casts for interior decor—became one such commodity, propelled both by its obvious embodiment of a standard of masculine beauty and by the association of Michelangelo's biography with the history of homosexuality. The latter point is important to emphasize, for it demonstrates how the idea of a homosexual type, once invented, was projected back chronologically to propose historical evidence for contemporary ideas. Michelangelo's fame made him...

Gay Aesthetics

Gay Aesthetics   Reference library

Christopher Reed

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
4,662 words

...identity. The image of Michelangelo’s David , for instance—reproduced as signage for commercial establishments and as plaster casts for interior decor—became one such commodity, propelled by its obvious embodiment of a standard of masculine beauty and by the association of Michelangelo’s biography with the history of homosexuality. The latter point is important, for it demonstrates how the idea of a homosexual type, once invented, was projected back chronologically to propose historical evidence for contemporary ideas. Michelangelo’s fame made him one of the...

Watts, George Frederic

Watts, George Frederic (1817–1904)   Reference library

The Continuum Encyclopedia of British Philosophy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
730 words

... 1837 he exhibited literary paintings and portraits. The latter, produced throughout his career, brought him renown, mainly through ‘The Hall of Fame’, a series of portraits of eminent Victorians. In Italy, from 1843 to 1847 , exposure to Renaissance painting (particularly Michelangelo) convinced Watts of art's elevated purpose and the need to develop a public art aesthetic focusing on universal and eternal concerns. He subsequently painted didactic moral and spiritual allegories which he termed ‘ethical reflections’. From the early 1880s his considerable...

Renaissance Italian Aesthetics

Renaissance Italian Aesthetics   Reference library

Tamara Albertini

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
4,783 words
Illustration(s):
2

...mathematical formulation but still recommended the use of proportions, Michelangelo did not view beauty as a calculable harmonious concord of lines and colors. The actual measure is not performed by the compass in the artist’s hand, but by his intelletto , a term that for Michelangelo translated Plotinus’s voûs/noûs (reason, intuition) and also had features typically associated with the ingegno . Warren Cheney aptly coined the notion of “creative proportion” to characterize Michelangelo’s art ( Clements, 1961 , p. 33). The possession of intelletto ,...

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