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Michelangelo phenomenon

A pattern of relationship interdependence in which close partners influence each other's dispositions, values, and behavioural patterns in such a manner as to bring both people closer to ...

Michelangelo phenomenon

Michelangelo phenomenon n.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Psychology (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... phenomenon n. A pattern of relationship interdependence in which close partners influence each other’s dispositions, values, and behavioural patterns in such a manner as to bring both people closer to their ideal selves . The concept was introduced by the US psychologist Stephen Michael Drigotas (born 1966 ) and several collaborators in an article in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology in 1999 reporting the results of four experiments designed to elucidate the phenomenon. [Named after the Italian sculptor Michelangelo...

Michelangelo phenomenon

Michelangelo phenomenon  

A pattern of relationship interdependence in which close partners influence each other's dispositions, values, and behavioural patterns in such a manner as to bring both people closer to their ideal ...
Arte Povera

Arte Povera   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Art Terms (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
87 words

...such as cement, twigs, or newspapers, in deliberate contrast to traditional sculptural materials such as stone and metal. Its often metaphorical imagery was taken from nature, history, or contemporary life. Arte Povera was a phenomenon of the later 1960s and 1970s and is primarily associated with artists such as Michelangelo Pistoletto and Giulio Paolini , though it can also accurately be applied to non-Italian figures such as Joseph Beuys...

Mannerism

Mannerism   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Christian Art & Architecture (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
2,314 words

...‘rules’ of the classical tradition, artistic virtuosity takes on a new level of importance. Early evidence of the application of maniera to art can be seen in Giorgio Vasari ’s Vite ( 1550 ), where the author uses the word to describe the work of Michelangelo. While clearly intended to convey Michelangelo’s extraordinary virtuosity and ingenuity, Vasari’s choice of terminology may also imply the potential dangers of individual artistic licence, especially for artists like himself endowed with lesser talents. The question of the unclassical nature of...

Mannerism

Mannerism   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Western Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
1,516 words

...providing explanations for the changes he observed. Dvořák ( 1921 ) identified in the elongated forms and unreal spatial structures of El Greco , Tintoretto , and the late Michelangelo a spiritual inwardness which was quite distinct from the confident materialism of the Renaissance. This for him constituted Mannerism; it was a European rather than simply an Italian phenomenon. He interpreted it as a response to a crisis that had religious, political, and intellectual dimensions, when old certainties disappeared after the Renaissance and the Protestant...

art cinema

art cinema   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Film Studies

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Media studies
Length:
563 words

...and Robert Bresson ( Journal d'un curé de campagne/Diary of a Country Priest (France, 1951 )). Other key European art cinema directors include Ingmar Bergman ( Det sjunde enseglet/The Seventh Seal (Sweden, 1957 )), Federico Fellini ( 8½ (Italy/France, 1963 )), and Michelangelo Antonioni ( Il deserto rosso/The Red Desert (Italy/France, 1964 )). In these years, work by non-European directors (most prominently Akira Kurosawa ( Rashomon , Japan, 1950 ); Kenji Mizoguchi ( Ugetsu Monogatari/Tales of Moonlight and Rain , Japan, 1953 ); and ...

Gay Aesthetics

Gay Aesthetics   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
3,656 words

...The image of Michelangelo's David , for instance—reproduced as signage for commerical establishments and as plaster casts for interior decor—became one such commodity, propelled both by its obvious embodiment of a standard of masculine beauty and by the association of Michelangelo's biography with the history of homosexuality. The latter point is important to emphasize, for it demonstrates how the idea of a homosexual type, once invented, was projected back chronologically to propose historical evidence for contemporary ideas. Michelangelo's fame made him...

Renaissance

Renaissance   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Western Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
3,836 words

...era of Mannerism . It was not exclusively an Italian phenomenon or under Italian influence—the ‘ Antwerp Mannerists ’ are quite reasonably so called—and it is difficult to define, partly because, like the term Renaissance itself, it is meant to circumscribe a period, designate a style, and represent certain values, all at once. Venice , too, felt the pull of High Renaissance Rome, Sebastiano del Piombo emigrating to the household of the papal banker Agostino Chigi , a lasting association with Michelangelo, and eventually the curia. Titian, merging all the...

Gay Aesthetics

Gay Aesthetics   Reference library

Christopher Reed

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
4,662 words

...identity. The image of Michelangelo’s David , for instance—reproduced as signage for commercial establishments and as plaster casts for interior decor—became one such commodity, propelled by its obvious embodiment of a standard of masculine beauty and by the association of Michelangelo’s biography with the history of homosexuality. The latter point is important, for it demonstrates how the idea of a homosexual type, once invented, was projected back chronologically to propose historical evidence for contemporary ideas. Michelangelo’s fame made him one of the...

Watts, George Frederic

Watts, George Frederic (1817–1904)   Reference library

The Continuum Encyclopedia of British Philosophy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
730 words

... 1837 he exhibited literary paintings and portraits. The latter, produced throughout his career, brought him renown, mainly through ‘The Hall of Fame’, a series of portraits of eminent Victorians. In Italy, from 1843 to 1847 , exposure to Renaissance painting (particularly Michelangelo) convinced Watts of art's elevated purpose and the need to develop a public art aesthetic focusing on universal and eternal concerns. He subsequently painted didactic moral and spiritual allegories which he termed ‘ethical reflections’. From the early 1880s his considerable...

Renaissance Italian Aesthetics

Renaissance Italian Aesthetics   Reference library

Tamara Albertini

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
4,783 words
Illustration(s):
2

...mathematical formulation but still recommended the use of proportions, Michelangelo did not view beauty as a calculable harmonious concord of lines and colors. The actual measure is not performed by the compass in the artist’s hand, but by his intelletto , a term that for Michelangelo translated Plotinus’s voûs/noûs (reason, intuition) and also had features typically associated with the ingegno . Warren Cheney aptly coined the notion of “creative proportion” to characterize Michelangelo’s art ( Clements, 1961 , p. 33). The possession of intelletto ,...

Renaissance Italian Aesthetics

Renaissance Italian Aesthetics   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
4,233 words
Illustration(s):
2

...formulation but still recommended the use of proportions, Michelangelo did not view beauty as a calculable harmonious concord of lines and colors. The actual measure is not performed by the compass in the artist's hand, but by his intelletto , a term that for Michelangelo translated Plotinus 's voûs noûs (reason, intuition) and also had features typically associated with the ingegno . Warren Cheney aptly coined the notion of “creative proportion” to characterize Michelangelo's art (Clements, 1961 , p. 33). The possession of intelletto ,...

Illustrated Bibles

Illustrated Bibles   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Bible

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Religion
Length:
1,486 words

...Bibles . The subject of illustrations to the Bible includes not only two‐dimensional designs, such as paintings, drawings, engravings, photographs, stained‐glass windows, and mosaics, but three‐dimensional works as well, such as statues and bas‐reliefs. Raphael 's madonnas, Michelangelo 's Moses, the windows of Chartres Cathedral, the ceiling mosaics of the Santa Sophia in Istanbul, and Ghiberti's great doors to the Baptistry in Florence are all, in a sense, Bible illustrations. Annotations to the Bible are also illustrations of it, and originally this was...

Apocalypticism

Apocalypticism   Reference library

J. Todd Hibbard

The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Bible and Theology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Religion
Length:
3,697 words

...phenomenon in the Hellenistic period, and Christian apocalypticism constituted a first-century c.e. development from within Judaism. Most scholars posit that certain intellectual, social, and religious pressures created by Hellenism on Judaism led to the creation of apocalyptic viewpoints. Many of these views were inherited by early Christians, who elaborated them in their own distinctive ways. Early apocalypticists likely drew on several prior traditions; indeed, several antecedent traditions appear to have played some role in the phenomenon’s...

Insane, Art of the

Insane, Art of the   Reference library

Aaron H. Esman

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
2,246 words

...detailed in John MacGregor’s The Discovery of the Art of the Insane . The question of the relationship between art and mental illness can be traced at least to Plato who, like Aristotle, addressed the “divine madness” of creative individuals. More recently, much was made of Michelangelo’s “terribilita,” and Romantically tinged formulations about the nature of Vincent van Gogh’s disorder and its effects on his art continue to flow unabated. There has also been a significant body of art about mental illness, systematically discussed in Sander Gilman’s Seeing...

Delacroix, Ferdinand-Victor-Eugène

Delacroix, Ferdinand-Victor-Eugène   Reference library

Michèle Hannoosh

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
2,431 words

...Delacroix ( 1798–1863 ) is one of the most important works in the literature of art history: a masterpiece of art criticism of the stature of the Salons of Denis Diderot and Charles Baudelaire, and one of a highly select group of artists’ writings including the poems of Michelangelo, the notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci, and the Discourses of Joshua Reynolds. The record of a life at once public and private, it documents Delacroix’s daily activities and thoughts for a brief period of his youth ( 1822–1824 ), and then from 1847 to his death, uniting...

Delacroix, Ferdinand-Victor-Eugène

Delacroix, Ferdinand-Victor-Eugène   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
2,355 words
Illustration(s):
1

...Delacroix ( 1798–1863 ) is one of the most important works in the literature of art history: a masterpiece of art criticism of the stature of the Salons of Denis Diderot and Charles Baudelaire , and one of a highly select group of artists’ writings including the poems of Michelangelo, the notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci , and the Discourses of Joshua Reynolds . The record of a life at once public and private, it documents Delacroix's daily activities and thoughts for a brief period of his youth ( 1822–1824 ), and then from 1847 to his death, uniting...

Renaissance

Renaissance   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of Christian Art & Architecture (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Religion
Length:
4,808 words

...patronage of Lorenzo de Medici, Giuliano de Medici, and other influential families, Florence became a magnet for artists aspiring to achieve recognition and status in a fiercely competitive environment. It was also from here that many famous artists, such as Leonardo and Michelangelo , were to seek their fortunes in other parts of Italy, such as Milan and Rome. An important aspect of Ghiberti’s work is his attempt as a writer to articulate the structure and meaning of linear perspective, which he applied to the bronze relief panels for the Florence...

phrenology

phrenology   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Mind (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Science and technology, Psychology, Philosophy
Length:
1,742 words
Illustration(s):
2

...prominent in women and apes, in whom the love of infants is supposedly stronger than in men. To take an intellectual example: No. 22 (Individuality), immediately above the nose, was named as the organ for recognizing external objects and for forming ideas from being large in Michelangelo and small in the Scots. The 26 regions identified as personality organs by Gall (increased to as many as 43 by later phrenologists) were based on very few instances. Implausible excuses were made for exceptions, and for such matters as inability to distinguish the skulls of...

Rome: patronage and collecting

Rome: patronage and collecting   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Western Art

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Art & Architecture
Length:
2,044 words

...re-established papacy soon transferred its court to the Vatican Palace. The most celebrated artists in Italy were obtained for this politically vital site, and teams were brought in from Tuscany and central Italy. Julius II took this to a peak of achievement by employing Michelangelo for the Sistine chapel ceiling ( 1508–12 ), Raphael for the Stanze ( 1509–17 ), and Bramante for the construction (from 1503 ) of the vast Belvedere court, modelled on ancient imperial villas. It was here that Julius displayed the finest Antique sculptures that had been...

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