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The Winter’s Tale

The Winter’s Tale   Reference library

Michael Dobson, Will Sharpe, and Anthony Davies

The Oxford Companion to Shakespeare (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Literature, Shakespeare studies and criticism, Performing arts, Theatre
Length:
3,428 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...by Paulina and her attendants, he accepts the truth of the oracle. He is already repenting when Paulina returns and tells him Hermione too has died: welcoming her bitter reproaches, he promises to mourn his dead wife and son perpetually. 3.3 Antigonus has dreamed of Hermione’s ghost, who told him to call the baby Perdita and leave it in Bohemia, prophesying that Antigonus would never see Paulina again. Believing the child must really be Polixenes’, he has been brought to the Bohemian coast by ship, and as the weather worsens he leaves Perdita there, with a...

Paul and Thecla, Acts of Sts

Paul and Thecla, Acts of Sts   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3 rev. ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Religion
Length:
389 words

...Paul was charged before the civil authorities and beaten, while Thecla was condemned to death by burning, but miraculously saved. Other incidents in various parts of Asia Minor are described in the lives of both Paul and Thecla, and theActs’ conclude with the record of Thecla's death at Seleucia. It is not impossible that theActscontain some elements of historical truth. Gk. text pr. in R. A. Lipsius and M. Bonnet (eds.), Acta Apostolorum Apocrypha , 1 (Leipzig, 1891), 235–72, Eng. tr. in J. K. Elliott , The Apocryphal New Testament ...

Truth

Truth   Reference library

Peter Lamarque and Stein Haugom Olsen

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
9,226 words

...( 1972 , 1460a). These remarks illustrate not only that the question of the verisimilitude of a work of art is different from that of its (literal) truth, but also that it was commonly accepted through the classical period that historical truth and accuracy had lower priority than verisimilitude. The function of poetry, the art in which the question of truth has always arisen in its most acute form, was, in Horace’s words (65–8 bce ), held to be “to do good or to give pleasure—or, thirdly, to say things which are both pleasing and serviceable for life”...

Truth

Truth   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
9,019 words

...Plutarch, the Greeks also held that “poetry owed its charm and honour to its power to express things in a lifelike way: as Homer says [ Odyssey , 19.203], ‘she spoke many lies, resembling truth’ ” ( Moralia , 1972 , 346 f ff.). The concern for verisimilitude also emerges in Aristotle's much-quoted dictum that “one ought to prefer likely impossibilities to unconvincing possibilities” ( 1972 , 1460a ). These remarks illustrate not only that the question of the verisimilitude of a work of art is different from that of its (literal) truth, but that it was...

Fiction

Fiction   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
7,060 words

...focus on sentences that include fictions as nouns with a view toward more precisely establishing two things, the referent of such expressions and the truth or falsity of assertions that incorporate such expressions. In the first case, the problem has been to distinguish between two kinds of objects. On the one hand, the referent of a fictional expression might be taken as a nonactual object of some sort that subsists that might exist (i.e., that is not impossible), but will never exist in the sense of being a spatiotemporal segment of the one actual world....

Pragmatics and Contextual Semantics

Pragmatics and Contextual Semantics   Reference library

International Encyclopedia of Linguistics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
14,188 words

...Speech acts are, of course, also of concern to semantics. A few words, like hello , have meanings that may be given by a specification of the speech acts they are used to perform. Other words, like promise , refer to acts the performance of which can be accomplished by sincere utterances of sentences containing them. In some cases, the boundary between pragmatics and contextual semantics is not entirely clear, and certain linguistic phenomena may be the proper concern of both. This is true of some indexicals. Squarely within the domain of contextual...

Fiction

Fiction   Reference library

Peter McCormick and Wolfgang Iser

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
4,354 words

...to focus on sentences that include fictions as nouns with a view toward more precisely establishing two things, the referent of such expressions and the truth or falsity of assertions that incorporate such expressions. In the first case, the problem has been to distinguish between two kinds of objects. On the one hand, the referent of a fictional expression might be taken as a nonactual object of some sort that subsists that might exist (i.e., that is not impossible) but will never exist in the sense of being a spatiotemporal segment of the one actual world....

Postmodern and Poststructural International Political Economy

Postmodern and Poststructural International Political Economy   Reference library

Joscha Wullweber and Christoph Scherrer

The International Studies Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Social sciences, Politics, Warfare and Defence
Length:
10,663 words

...there is no meaningful “reality” outside the field of discursivity. But the “discursive character of an object does not, by any means, imply putting its existence into question” ( Laclau and Mouffe 1990 :100, italics original). Accordingly, meaning is not simple existent, nor is it determined or entangled with the existence of the object. However, that does not mean that there is no truth. Instead, truth and relations of meaning are constantly constructed, negotiated, and historically changing. Every discourse is the contingent product of hegemonic...

Derrida, Jacques

Derrida, Jacques   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Aesthetics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Philosophy
Length:
15,511 words

...in a direct line to law; that line is a nonpassage, an aporia. Yet justice is disclosed in law, even as its own effacement. This is the peculiar nature of the deconstructive embrace. Ethics as “the experience of the impossible” and politics as the calculus of action are also in a deconstructive embrace. The space of being is the gift of time (so to speak): We fall into time, we begin to “be,” unanticipatably. To call it a gift is to solve that aporia by thinking of some other (one) that “gives” time. Thus life is lived as the call of the wholly other, which must...

History

History   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Rhetoric

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
7,099 words

.... It is impossible to discuss history without first establishing some terms of reference, since the word is at least as slippery as rhetoric itself. In one of its senses, history means “events that have happened in the past”; in another of its senses, it is equivalent to “historical writing” (for which historiography is often a synonym). This overlap of meaning constitutes a helpful reminder that very often we know of events only because they have been written down. However real an event was at the time when it occurred, the past is an abstraction:...

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