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Hassu Khan Haddu Khan

Subject: Music

Well-known 19th-cent. vocalists of the Gwalior durbar. They were brothers. Along with them, Natthu Khan is sometimes mentioned as a brother, but in some references, he is mentioned as a ...

Hassu Khan Haddu Khan

Hassu Khan Haddu Khan  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Music
Well-known 19th-cent. vocalists of the Gwalior durbar. They were brothers. Along with them, Natthu Khan is sometimes mentioned as a brother, but in some references, he is mentioned as a cousin. ...
Hassu Khan

Hassu Khan  

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Overview Page
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Music
(b. Gwalior, c. 1790; d. Gwalior, c. 1855) Vocalist of the brother-duo Haddu-Hassu Khan of Gwalior.He was the elder of the duo and died about 20 years before his younger brother. See Haddu Khan, ...
Bī Rahimanbāi

Bī Rahimanbāi  

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Music
(b. ?; d. ?) Mid-19th cent. singer of Charkhari, Uttar Pradesh.Chronicler Karam Imam quotes vocalist Haddu Khan (c. 1786–1875) of the Haddu-Hassu duo, as having said that Bi-Rahimanbai was ...
Muhband Tān

Muhband Tān  

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Music
A variety of tān, rendered by humming, mouth closed. Hassu Khan of the Haddu-Hassu vocal duo of the Gwālior khayāl gharānā, was known for this style.
Chooḍia Imām Bakhsh

Chooḍia Imām Bakhsh  

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Music
(b. ?; d. ?) Eminent 19th-cent. tabla player.He was a contemporary of the famous Gwalior vocalists Haddu Khan (1794–1875) and Hassu Khan (1790–1855).Imam Bakhsh learnt tabla from Haji ...
Mangubāi

Mangubāi  

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Music
(b. ?, c. 1850; d. ?, c. 1940) Noted dhrupad singer of the Gwalior durbar.It is believed that she received some training from Haddu and Hassu Khan of the same durbar.[...]
Hassu Khan

Hassu Khan (c. 1790)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopaedia of the Music of India

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Music
Length:
39 words

... Khan ( b. Gwalior , c. 1790 ; d. Gwalior , c. 1855 ) Vocalist of the brother-duo Haddu - Hassu Khan of Gwalior . He was the elder of the duo and died about 20 years before his younger brother. See Haddu Khan, Hassu Khan...

Muhband Tān

Muhband Tān  

The Oxford Encyclopaedia of the Music of India

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Subject:
Music

...Tān A variety of tān, rendered by humming, mouth closed. Hassu Khan of the Haddu-Hassu vocal duo of the Gwālior khayāl gharānā, was known for this...

Haddu Khan

Haddu Khan  

The Oxford Encyclopaedia of the Music of India

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Subject Reference
Subject:
Music

...the two daughters of Haddu Khan, one was married to his disciple Bande Ali Khan (rudra veena), and the other to his disciple Inayat Hussain Khan of the Sahaswān gharānā. Haddu Khan's disciples also include Banne Khan , Rambhau Saverkar , Bala Guru , Alibaugkar , and Gopal Chandra Chakravarti (of Kolkata). Haddu and Hassu had a soft corner for Marathi Brahmins, one reason being that Hassu's disciple Devji-bua Paranjape from this community, had taught them the original dhrupad tradition of Gwālior ( see Devji-bua .). Haddu Khan had a special...

Sahabdād Khan

Sahabdād Khan  

The Oxford Encyclopaedia of the Music of India

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Subject Reference
Subject:
Music

...Khan ( b. ?, c. 1830 ; d. ?, c. 1880 ) Vocalist and sitar player, founder of the Etawah tradition of sitar, of Uttar Pradesh . He was the great-grandfather of sitar maestro Vilayat Khan . He was a vocalist in the Gwalior durbar during the days of the eminent vocal-duo Haddu and Hassu Khan . Besides the sitar, he played the surbahār, though not professionally. He trained his son, Imdad Hussain Khan , in the primers of sitar, surbahār, and khayāl. It is said that he originally had a Hindu name, Saheb Singh . Lineage: Sahabdad Khan > Imdad Khan ...

Natthu Khan

Natthu Khan  

The Oxford Encyclopaedia of the Music of India

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Subject:
Music

...Khan ( b. ?, late 18th cent.; d. ?, c. 1884 ) Eminent exponent of the Gwālior khayāl gharānā . He was trained for a short while by his father, Kader Bakhsh , who died when Natthu Khan was quite young. Thereafter, he was under the tutelage of his uncle, Natthan Pir Bakhsh . Later, Maharaja Jiyajirao Scindia appointed him in his durbar. His better-known brothers, Haddu and Hassu were members of the same durbar. Natthu Khan never went out of Gwalior on professional tours. He adopted Nissar Hussain Khan as his son and trained him thoroughly....

Imdādkhāni Bāj

Imdādkhāni Bāj   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopaedia of the Music of India

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Music
Length:
64 words

...Bāj The style (bāj) of Imdad Hussain Khan , eminent exponent of the sitar and surbahār. Characteristics of this style are long meenḍs, the use of chikarī strings, restriction in the use of fingers of both hands, and the use of the idioms or modes of khayāl instead of dhrupad. Imdad Hussain studied khayāl under Haddu Khan of the Hassu-Haddu vocal duo of...

Gwālior Khayāl Gharānā

Gwālior Khayāl Gharānā  

The Oxford Encyclopaedia of the Music of India

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Subject Reference
Subject:
Music

...the versions also agree that Haddu, Hassu, and Natthu Khan laid the base for the Gwalior khayāl style as known now. They were the star singers of the durbar of Jiyajirao Scindia ( r. 1843–66 ). The legacy was perpetuated by the sons and disciples of the three brothers. Some details are given below: The most noted early names are Haddu Khan's son Rahmat Khan and Natthu Khan's adopted son Nissar Hussain Khan . Hassu Khan's son Gule Imam Khan became a khayāl singer but he died early. Gule Imam's son Mehandi Hussain Khan carried forward the tradition...

Banné Khan

Banné Khan (25 Dec. 1835)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopaedia of the Music of India

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Music
Length:
342 words

...Khan ( b. Nausahana Nangali, Punjab , 25 Dec. 1835 ; d. Hyderabad , 1910 ) Vocalist . He was a durbar musician of Nizam Mir Mohammad Ali Khan Asifjah ( r. 1868–1911 ) of Hyderabad. In his early years, he must have received some training from his father Aman Khan of the durbar of Nawab Wajid Ali Shah ( r. 1847–56 ) of Lucknow. Later, Banne Khan became a disciple of Hassu Khan , of the celebrated Gwalior duo Haddu-Hassu . This discipleship was not conferred so easily, says B.R. Deodhar . In the Lucknow durbar, Banne Khan once heard a...

Jaisukhbāi

Jaisukhbāi  

The Oxford Encyclopaedia of the Music of India

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Subject Reference
Subject:
Music

... ( b. ?; d. ?) Khayāl singer . Her peak years were during 1840–50s. According to author Karam Imam she was in the durbars of Banda, Rampur, and Alwar in different periods. She was a disciple of Natthe Khan (a brother of the Haddu-Hassu duo of Gwalior). Two senior disciples of Natthe Khan — Serfobai and her mother Sedubai—looked after Jaisukhbai in her early...

Bī Rahimanbāi

Bī Rahimanbāi  

The Oxford Encyclopaedia of the Music of India

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Subject:
Music

...Rahimanbāi ( b. ?; d. ?) Mid-19th cent. singer of Charkhari, Uttar Pradesh . Chronicler Karam Imam quotes vocalist Haddu Khan ( c. 1786–1875 ) of the Haddu-Hassu duo, as having said that Bi-Rahimanbai was better than any male singer of her age. One of her gurus was Baburam Sahai of Allahabad. She was usually accompanied on the sārangi by Jatan Kathak of Benares. She married a musician, Moni Shah , but nothing much is known about him. She is said to have lived for about 75 years. Her sisters Sundarabai and Latfan too were musicians....

Jiyājirāo Scindia

Jiyājirāo Scindia  

The Oxford Encyclopaedia of the Music of India

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Subject Reference
Subject:
Music

...Scindia (Shindé) ( b. ?; d. ?) Royal patron of Gwalior state in Madhya Pradesh ( r. 1843–86 ). During his reign the Gwālior tradition of khayāl developed fully, and many talented young vocalists went to Gwalior to learn under the legendary Haddu and Hassu Khan . (See Gwālior Gharānā .) Jiyajirao's durbar also had the famous dancer Chandrabhaga—a consort to the Maharaja and mother of harmonium wizard Bhaiyya Ganapatrao —and other dancers like Resham and Mangoh...

Mangubāi

Mangubāi  

The Oxford Encyclopaedia of the Music of India

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Subject:
Music

...some training from Haddu and Hassu Khan of the same durbar. She had kept herself so physically fit that when she participated in a Kolkata function in honour of Lalchand Boral in 1930 , she was in her eighties but gave a successful rendition of Jayadēva's lyrics in the dhrupad style. Parvat Singh accompanied her on the pakhāwaj on that occasion. This event is the only clue to the period of her birth. Some documents indicate that there was another Mangubai in Gwalior who was a ṭhumrī singer and a disciple of Mehendi Hussain Khan...

Mubārak Ali Khan

Mubārak Ali Khan  

The Oxford Encyclopaedia of the Music of India

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Subject:
Music

...patterns of ālāp and tān, particularly tān, for which he was greatly admired by veterans like Alladiya Khan who, it is said, used to try to reproduce some of those patterns. Haddu and Hassu Khan of Gwalior, too, were his admirers. The Gwalior Maharaja of that time invited Mubārak Ali for a session in his durbar and honoured him. Mubārak Ali was a master to be ‘listened to’ and ‘benefited from’. He trained his father's disciple Mughlu Khan , after his father's demise. It appears that Mubārak Ali had no other major...

Bandé Ali Khan

Bandé Ali Khan (c. 1830)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopaedia of the Music of India

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Music
Length:
686 words
Illustration(s):
1

...father's death, Bande Ali moved to Jaipur where he often listened to the veena of Baḍé Rajab Ali Khan , sitar of Amritsen, and dhrupad of some vocalists from the Seni gharānā. He used all these techniques and styles in his veena playing and achieved fame within a short time. From Jaipur, he went to Gwalior where he impressed Haddu Khan (of the Haddu-Hassu duo) with his veena recital. Haddu Khan taught him khayāl and eventually Bande Ali married Haddu Khan 's daughter. From Gwalior, he moved to the Indore durbar of Shivajirao Holkar . According to V.N....

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