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establishment of the port

Subject: History

The interval between the time of meridian passage of the new or the full moon and the time of the following high tide. This interval which is constant for a given port is also known as the ...

Blackwood’s Magazine

Blackwood’s Magazine   Reference library

Oxford Reader’s Companion To Conrad

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
1,013 words

...was conservative and imperialist, an old British magazine with a long reputation and a steady readership in the Establishment: the army, the administration, the landed gentry, the upper middle class, the clergy, and the teaching profession, people who liked seriously intoned reading on royalty and the aristocracy, on the problems of the army and the navy … and about other countries in the world. … Above all, it focused on the colonial world: India, in the first place, was for a while dealt with in every issue, then—very often—Africa, British and … other colonial...

Kate

Kate   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

..., servant girl at the Dunmore Inn who assists Mrs Kelly in running the establishment. KOK MRS Monika Rydygier...

Croker's Hall

Croker's Hall   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...Hall , country seat of Mr Whittlestaff in Hampshire. A mile (0.5 km) from Alresford, the hall is a comfortable but modest establishment. OML RC Randall...

Mulready, Mrs

Mulready, Mrs   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...Mrs , ‘Strong, red-faced, indomitable-looking’ widow who keeps a shebeen, an unlicensed drinking establishment, in a two-room hovel in Mohill frequented by ‘the wicked, the desperate, and the drunken’ (IX), including a band of local Ribbonmen . MB MRS Monika Rydygier...

Kanturk Hotel

Kanturk Hotel   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...Hotel , low-class drinking establishment in the Irish city of Cork, owned by Mr O'Dwyer and tended by his daughter Fanny, which provides temporary headquarters for the Mollets while they blackmail Sir Thomas Fitzgerald . CR MRS Monika Rydygier...

Worts, Mr

Worts, Mr   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...Mr , foreman at the Bungall & Tappitt Brewery in Baslehurst. Worts is ‘a heavy, respectable, useful man, educated on the establishment by Bungall and bequeathed by Bungall to Tappitt’ (XXIV). Against the wishes of his boss Tappitt, the honest labourer says he will vote for the local squire, Mr Butler Cornbury . RR MT Mark W....

Cradell, Joseph

Cradell, Joseph   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...Joseph , intimate friend and coworker of Johnny Eames , with whom he lives at Mrs Roper 's boarding house. He flirts outrageously with Mrs Lupex , incurring the wrath of her husband, but eventually marries Amelia Roper and takes over her mother's establishment. In The Last Chronicle of Barset he has six children and money troubles. SHA NCS Nelson C....

Whiston, Robert

Whiston, Robert (1808–95)   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...Robert ( 1808–95 ) . Headmaster of Rochester Cathedral Grammar School ( 1844–77 ), he disclosed that the increased income was not being used either to increase free schooling or for scholarships, as required by the terms of the ancient endowment; the cathedral establishment was the obvious beneficiary. The Times in 1851–2 gave publicity to the scandal. This was one of several such abuses ventilated during Trollope 's gestation of The Warden ( 1855 ). RCT R. C....

Roanoke, Lucinda

Roanoke, Lucinda   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

... Jane Carbuncle , who enters into a disastrous engagement with Sir Griffin Tewett . Much against her will, Lucinda is dragged into the marriage market by the scheming Mrs Carbuncle , who is anxious that her niece find a proper establishment before exhausting her limited funds. After lapsing into near-madness at the prospect of marrying the sadistic Sir Griffin , Lucinda refuses to go to the church on the day set for the wedding. ED JMR Julia Miele...

Chambers's Edinburgh Journal

Chambers's Edinburgh Journal   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
117 words

...containing essays on a wide variety of literary, historical, and scientific subjects. Poetry, fiction, and biography made up the literary portion. Early numbers contained material reprinted from other sources, and the contributors were not of the first rank. Later numbers contained original material. After 1854 , it continued as Chambers's Journal of Popular Literature, Science and Art . Its success in Edinburgh led to the establishment of a similar popular weekly, Chambers's London Journal JWM Judith Wittosch...

Grant, Revd Joseph Brett

Grant, Revd Joseph Brett (1820–1879)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontës

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
112 words

...'s curate. Ordained priest in 1845 , he became curate-in-charge, and (by March 1846 ) perpetual curate of the new district of Oxenhope , where he worked energetically for the establishment of a National School and church. He married Sarah Ann Turner at Woodford, Essex, in January 1846 . Grant assisted Revd A. B. Nicholls at Branwell's funeral service. Nicholls stayed with the Grants before his marriage to Charlotte, and they were asked to the wedding...

‘Shakespeare Foundation Schools’

‘Shakespeare Foundation Schools’   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
153 words

...Foundation Schools’ (article) . This article in the London Telegraph describes a public meeting at the New Adelphi Theatre on 11 May 1864 presided over by Dickens , regarding the establishment of a public school for children of actors, on the property of the Shakespeare Foundation. Anthony Trollope proposed the following resolution: ‘That the schools shall be called the “ Shakespeare Foundation Schools”, and shall be devoted to the sound and liberal education of pupils of both sexes, and not be restricted to any profession or class; that...

‘Monthly Intelligencer’

‘Monthly Intelligencer’   Reference library

Victor Neufeldt

The Oxford Companion to the Brontës

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
152 words

...of the Commons are dominated by Rogue demanding the abolition of the monarchy and the establishment of a republic. Victor Neufeldt Alexander & Sellars , p. 303 (illustrations). Miscellaneous Writings , 1. 183–201. Neufeldt BB Works , 1....

Scoresby, Revd William

Scoresby, Revd William (1789–1857)   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontës

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
174 words

...he urged the establishment of more Anglican Sunday and day schools, including Haworth National School . On 9 January 1844 , he asked Revd Patrick Brontë , for the sake of the poor children of Haworth who were under his spiritual care, to call a church trustees' meeting to arrange for the appointment of an Oxford or Cambridge graduate at the Haworth Free Grammar School. In July 1844 he nominated Revd J. B. Grant as master of the grammar school to replace the Methodist Mr Ramsbottom. During a visit to Canada in 1847 he told Joseph Abbott of the Brontës'...

Royal Academy of Arts

Royal Academy of Arts   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Trollope

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
210 words

...Academy of Arts . The Royal Academy was the summit of the artistic establishment and never more influential than in the mid-Victorian period. Its self-elected members, mostly painters, were the arbiters of popular taste. Attending its summer exhibition, especially the exclusive Private View, which Trollope did regularly, was an essential ritual of the season. W. P. Frith 's painting The Private View of the Royal Academy, 1881 superbly captures its ambience, depicting a group of eminent Victorians including Browning , Gladstone , and Huxley , with ...

Last, Isaac

Last, Isaac (1814–66)   Reference library

Oxford Reader's Companion to Hardy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
206 words

...Isaac ( 1814–66 ), Dorchester schoolmaster . He was teaching at the British School in Greyhound Yard, Dorchester, when Hardy, then aged 10, was moved to this Nonconformist establishment in September 1850 after attending the National School nearer home. Last had a considerable local reputation as ‘an exceptionally able man, and a good teacher of Latin’ ( LW 22), and the move was instigated by Jemima Hardy 's ambitions for her son. Later Hardy began to study Latin with Last as an ‘extra’, and in 1853 , when Last started an ‘academy’ or private school,...

Peninsular War

Peninsular War   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontës

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
400 words

...the war was over before the births of Charlotte and her surviving siblings, the Brontës' childhood reading and political attitudes were informed by these recent events and by Revd Patrick Brontë 's intense interest in military affairs. In particular they read about the exploits of the British forces under the Duke of Wellington (still ‘Arthur Wellesley’ at the time), who had been sent to support the Spanish in repelling the French invasion and overthrowing the establishment of Napoleon's brother, Joseph Buonaparte , on the Spanish throne. The...

Leaf from an Unopened Volume, A

Leaf from an Unopened Volume, A   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Brontës

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
378 words

...William Etty , the unrecognized son of Northangerland. Fannie Ratchford described this as ‘The most melodramatic and unpleasant of all [Charlotte's] writing … a confused medley of intrigue, licentiousness, and fraternal hate, with illegitimate or disowned children, dwarfs, and Negroes playing leading parts’ ( The Brontës' Web of Childhood ( 1941 ), 83). This is the first manuscript to describe the new kingdom of Angria , which may suggest either that Charlotte had more to do with the establishment of Angria than previously thought or that the ‘Unfortunate...

‘History of the Young Men, The’

‘History of the Young Men, The’   Reference library

Victor Neufeldt

The Oxford Companion to the Brontës

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
349 words

...of the Young Men, The’ . In a hand-sewn booklet of eighteen pages (dated 7 May 1831 ; MS in BL), Captain John Bud (Branwell Brontë), in six chapters, details the establishment of the Glass Town Federation ( see glass town and angrian saga ) in the Ashantee territory of West Africa, and includes a map of the Federation. In the introduction Branwell describes how a set of toy soldiers became the Twelves who set sail for Africa . Among the crew were Arthur Wellesley (spelt Wellesly by Branwell; see wellington, duke of ); Sir W. E. Parry , ...

Warren's Blacking

Warren's Blacking   Reference library

Paul Schlicke

Oxford Reader's Companion to Dickens

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies (19th century)
Length:
376 words

...tried to mend a quarrel between his father and George Lamert (the ‘sort-of cousin’ who owned the factory) which had led to his being dismissed, and concluded, ‘I do not write resentfully or angrily: for I know how all these things have worked together to make me what I am, but I never afterwards forgot, I never shall forget, I never can forget, that my mother was warm for my being sent back’ (Forster 1.2). There were two Warrens, Robert and Jonathan , who had separate, rival establishments; Dickens worked for Jonathan. Robert was more famous from his...

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