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establishment of the port

Subject: History

The interval between the time of meridian passage of the new or the full moon and the time of the following high tide. This interval which is constant for a given port is also known as the ...

Establishment, The

Establishment, The   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

..., The A term long used to denote in particular the established church of england , but now a popular designation for the group or class of people who have authority within a society, especially, in Britain, those who control not only the Church of England but the government, the civil service and the armed forces. It has a somewhat derogatory significance associated with reaction, privilege and ‘stuffiness’. By theEstablishment’ I do not mean only the centres of official power – though they are certainly part of it – but rather the whole matrix...

establishment of the port

establishment of the port   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
166 words

... of the port , the interval between the time of meridian passage of the new or the full moon and the time of the following high tide . This interval which is constant for a given port is also known as the High Water Full and Change constant (HWF & C). The average interval is known as the mean high water lunitidal interval. Because the tides are governed largely by the moon, and because the time of meridian passage of the moon is later each day by about 50 minutes, it follows that, if the age of the moon and the establishment of the port are...

Establishment, the

Establishment, the n. (Aus.)   Reference library

Green's Dictionary of Slang

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Language reference
Length:
190 words

... ‘Establishment’ as by an amusing euphemism the prison is styled [AND]. 1878 G. Walch Australasia 47: The large gaol, or ‘Establishment’, as they politely term it. 1891 J.J. Roche Life of J. B. O'Reilly 69: The great white stone prison which is Fremantle's reason for existence. It was ‘The Establishment’. 1897 Z.W. Pease Catalpa Exped. 114: Mr Breslin was invited to inspect the prison, ‘The Establishment’, as they call it in the colony. 1987 (con. 1850–68 ) R. Hughes Fatal Shore ( 1988 ) 578: The monument of the System in Western...

Establishment, the

Establishment, the   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

..., the a group in a society exercising power and influence over matters of policy or taste, and seen as resisting change. The term is recorded intermittently from the 1920s, but in British English derives its current use from an article by the journalist Henry Fairlie in the Spectator of 1955...

Establishment, The

Establishment, The   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of London Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

..., The An ironically named club founded in 1961 by Peter Cook ( 1937–95 ) and Nicholas Luard ( 1937–2004 ). Based at 18 Greek Street, Soho , the Establishment became a hot-bed of the anti-establishment satire boom of that era. It closed in 1964...

Establishment, The

Establishment, The   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...mean only the centres of official power – though they are certainly part of it – but rather the whole matrix of official and social relations within which power is exercised … theEstablishment’ can be seen at work in the activities of, not only the Prime Minister, the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Earl Marshal, but of such lesser mortals as the Chairman of the Arts Council, the Director-General of the BBC, and even the editor of the Times Literary Supplement , not to mention dignitaries like Lady Violet Bonham Carter . henry fairlie : in The Spectator ...

The Independence of New Spain and the Establishment of the Mexican Republic, 1808–1824

The Independence of New Spain and the Establishment of the Mexican Republic, 1808–1824   Reference library

Jaime E. Rodríguez O.

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Mexican History and Culture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2019
Subject:
History, Regional and National History
Length:
11,795 words

... Independence of New Spain and the Establishment of the Mexican Republic, 1808–1824 The independence of New Spain was not the result of an anticolonial struggle. Rather, it was a consequence of a great political revolution that culminated in the dissolution of the Spanish Monarchy, a world-wide political system. The movement was an integral part of the broader process that was transforming antiguo régimen societies into modern liberal nation states. The new country of Mexico that emerged from the break up of the Spanish Monarchy retained many of the shared...

establishment of the port

establishment of the port  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The interval between the time of meridian passage of the new or the full moon and the time of the following high tide. This interval which is constant for a given port is also known as the High Water ...
Education

Education   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,267 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...a century earlier had the Anglican establishment become so exercised in the matter of popular education. It set up the ‘National Society for Promoting the Education of the Poor in the Principles of the Established Church’ as a direct counter to the Lancaster faction's promotional organization, which became known as the ‘British and Foreign School Society’. There are grounds for arguing, however, that the rivalry of these two bodies, and of the forces they represented, did as much to impede as to aid the spread of education through the British nation at large....

Redundancy

Redundancy   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
926 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...have been more obvious both to the writer and to the editors that the phrasing was redundant.) • “Curtis and Company was a prosperous chemist's shop on Crawford Street, the nearest such to Baker Street; Holmes and I both frequented the establishment on a regular basis .” Barbara Paul , “The Sleuth of Christmas Past,” in Holmes for the Holidays 18, 19 ( Martin H. Greenberg et al. eds., 1996 ). (“To frequent” means to “to visit (a place) often or habitually.”) • “That each creature from microbe to man is unique in all the world is amazing when you...

Contractions

Contractions   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
979 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...Rosen , “The Trivialization of Tragedy,” in Dumbing Down: Essays on the Strip Mining of American Culture 270, 280 ( Katharine Washburn & John F. Thornton eds., 1996 ). • “Weinstein doesn't doubt that the Hollywood establishment wishes him ill, but he doesn't think it's personal.” Ken Auletta , “Beauty and the Beast,” New Yorker , 16 Dec. 2002 , at 81. The common fear is that using contractions can make the writing seem breezy. For most of us, though, that risk is nil. What you gain should be a relaxed sincerity—not breeziness. Among the wisest...

Central Government, Courts, and Taxation

Central Government, Courts, and Taxation   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Family and Local History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
7,750 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...and saw the repression of the †poor and indigent as a necessary step towards the establishment of a purer society (the set of attitudes we loosely call puritan). These policies were also backed up by a further tribunal which was designed to check up on the conduct of the Crown's local officers and deal with behaviour (such as enclosure or trading offences) which, if not actually illegal, was contrary to the public good. The last decade of conciliar and Star Chamber activism came in the 1630s, when the council tried to check on the local activity of the JPs to...

Enlightenment

Enlightenment   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
7,794 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...alien religious establishment and on Methodistical enthusiasm alike, and formed an almost unique example of an enduring rural Enlightenment. It was perhaps inevitable that in the overcharged atmosphere of the 1790s *millenarian ideas proved especially attractive. Mythic notions of the Welsh being the first to colonize America found expression in the search for the Welsh Indians. Welshmen such as Morgan John *Rhys sought salvation in America, where he hoped to create a new homeland in Beulah, Pennsylvania. Yet such schemes were less the expression of wild...

Religion

Religion   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
5,549 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...many societies for the *reformation of manners and, at the very turn of the century, the Society for Propagating the Gospel in Foreign Parts and the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge. The last-named stood at the centre of the notable movement for the establishment of charity schools to bring learning to children at more humble social levels than those catered to by the long-established grammar schools. Although the impetus of this broad movement was not maintained at the initial level, these institutions survived and tied in with the extraordinary...

Empire

Empire   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,298 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...it, the strong bias towards the views of the landed interest were, however, gradually supplanted as the machinery of the British state was belatedly compelled to expand and readjust to take account of the growing girth of empire. The ineluctable need for the British state to become involved in the affairs of India as the scale of imperial involvement surpassed the competence of the East India Company paved the way for greater state direction elsewhere in the empire. The India Act of 1784 and the establishment of the Board of Control proved to be the first...

Viewing

Viewing   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,051 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...as the dispersal of the Walpole collection at Houghton Hall and the various schemes proposed for the establishment of a National Gallery are part of a halting articulation of what might now be termed a sense of national ‘cultural heritage’. The history of art in the Romantic era is the gradual revelation of the role of art and its publics within this construct. Barrell, J. , The Political Theory of Painting from Reynolds to Hazlitt , New Haven, Conn., 1986; Friedman, W. , Boydell's Shakespeare Gallery , New York, 1976; Hazlitt, W. , Sketches of the...

Local Government

Local Government   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Family and Local History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,193 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...active magistracy and the development of the latent authority of the bench. A further development was the practice of appointing standing chairmen of the Commission, instead of annual chairmen or chairmen for individual sessions. The appearance of permanent chairmen (e.g. in Oxfordshire in 1771 , Shropshire in 1785 ) permitted the appearance of capable administrators and administrative continuity. A number of county chairmen made reputations as innovators in organization of the Commission with the establishment of subcommittees to act on specific...

Publishing

Publishing   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,242 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...establishments and institutions or from individuals. The humblest literature— *almanacs , *ballads , chap-books, and other forms of *street literature —could be purchased from the itinerant pedlars and chapmen who travelled the countryside selling trinkets, gifts, household goods, and toys. Even the most prosperous establishments stocked items other than books, for book-selling alone was rarely sufficient to make a decent living, and not all the commodities and services the bookseller offered were directly connected with the culture of print. The...

Design

Design   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
6,178 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...should be established throughout the country, and that local schools should be specifically related to the needs of local manufacturers. In 1836 the government's vote of £1,500 for the establishment of a school of design in London marked the beginning of a new era which saw the development of design in relation to the fine arts on the one hand and industry on the other. It was no longer to be the concern of a privileged few, nor yet of enlightened manufacturers, but a state responsibility shouldered, albeit reluctantly, for the general good of all. Brewer, J....

The Poor

The Poor   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Family and Local History (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, Local and Family History
Length:
5,014 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...the use of the pauper's badge was abandoned, and inspectors were appointed to enforce these laws. The establishment of these 18th‐century workhouses is noted in the accounts of the overseers of the poor, but detailed records usually do not survive, since the operation was often let out to contractors. However, descriptions of a selection of workhouses throughout the country are contained in the abridged (single‐volume) version of Sir Frederick Morton Eden , The State of the Poor ( 1797 ). This gives precise information on the number of paupers in the...

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