You are looking at 1-9 of 9 entries  for:

  • All : basic rest-activity cycle x
  • Social Welfare and Social Services x
clear all

View:

Overview

basic rest-activity cycle

A biological rhythm of waxing and waning alertness with a period of approximately 90 minutes in humans. During sleep it controls the cycles of REM and slow-wave sleep. Also called the ...

Human Needs

Human Needs   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Social Work (20 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008

...M. C. (1978). Basic human needs: A framework for action (report to the United Nations Environment Programme). New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Books. McHale, J. , & McHale, M. C. (1979). Meeting basic human needs . The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science , 442, 13–27. McMunn, A. , Bartley, M. , & Kuh, D. (2006). Women's health in mid-life: Life course social roles and agency as quality . Social science &medicine , 63(6), 1561–1572. Moon, B. E. (1991). Basic human needs. In The political economy of basic human needs (pp....

Psychotropic Medications

Psychotropic Medications   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Social Work (20 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008

...stabilizer, is a natural element thought to be very effective in treating mania as well as preventing episodes of mania and mood cycling. Its side effects include nausea and diarrhea, possible kidney damage, and tremors. It is potentially fatal in overdose and must be monitored with frequent blood tests to ensure that the level of lithium in the blood is high enough to be effective, but not so high as to cause toxicity. The rest of the mood stabilizers were initially developed as medications to treat seizures. They include Depakote (valproic acid), Tegratol...

Adolescents

Adolescents   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Social Work (20 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Social sciences, Social Welfare and Social Services
Length:
22,463 words
Illustration(s):
2

...early adolescence . Journal of Early Adolescence , 25(2), 223–249. Offer, D. (1967). Normal adolescents: Interview strategy and selected results . Archives of General Psychiatry , 17, 285–290. Offer, D. , & Sabshin, M. (1984). Normality and the life cycle: A critical integration . New York: Basic Books. Offer, D. , Sabshin, M. , & Marcus, I. (1965). Clinical evaluation of normal adolescents . American Journal of Psychiatry , 21, 864–872. Paikoff, R. L. , & Brooks-Gunn, J. (1991). Do parent-child relationships change during puberty? ...

Group Dynamics

Group Dynamics   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Social Work (20 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008

...related to particular stages may recur at any stage of a group's development. An early example of a repeating cycle model is that of Bales' ( 1950 ) who postulated that groups go through a rhythm (to establish an equilibrium) in which the group moves from dealing with tasks to managing socioemotional matters to enhance interpersonal relationships. A more recent example is Worshel's model ( 1994 ) consisting of six stages through which groups cycle. A variation occurs in short-term, single-session, and open-membership groups. These groups often remain at the...

Management

Management   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Social Work (20 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008

...their employer's assessment of their work-related contribution and performance. One aspect of HRM practices that provides a foundation for performance evaluation involves setting performance goals between the supervisor and supervisee. Establishment of basic expectations at the beginning of the employment cycle regarding an employee's performance should be set forth initially upon hiring and at predetermined intervals. During an employee's tenure, these performance goals should be reassessed and renegotiated to create optimal worker effectiveness and...

Group Work

Group Work   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Social Work (20 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008

...and vigilance to ensure a consistent approach to all aspects of the group work process” (Brown & Mistry, 2005 , p. 140). Social justice is an ideal condition in which all members of a society have the same basic rights, protection, opportunities, obligations, and social benefits (Barker, 1995 ). One of the principles upon which group work as a method rests is its conviction that group work can and should prepare individuals for democratic participation in their communities (Breton, 2004 ). Groups geared toward social action (i.e., collective action directed...

Social Work Education

Social Work Education   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Social Work (20 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008

...p. 45). The need to study welfare policy was aggressively supported by Edith Abbott in 1928 when she argued “there are no more fundamental or basic subjects of study for our profession than public welfare administration, social legislation…” (cited in Kendall, 2002 , p. 17). By 1944 , social welfare policy was identified by the American Association of Schools of Social Work as one of the “basic eight” areas of study (Kendall, p. 151) and was included in CSWE's original accreditation standards in 1952 (Frumkin & Lloyd, 1995 , p. 2239)....

Alcohol and Drug Problems

Alcohol and Drug Problems   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Social Work (20 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008

...three basic classifications of interventions based on the kind of population they target (Institute of Medicine, 1994 ; Offord, 2000 ). 1. Universal prevention targets all individuals regardless of their level of risk. Prevention in this case aims at deterring or delaying the onset of substance use; for example, all 7th graders in a classroom, without tailoring the message to those at different levels of risk. Interventions using this kind of strategy combined with a zero tolerance or abstinence messages may come across as naïve and too basic for youth...

Asian Americans

Asian Americans   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Social Work (20 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2008
Subject:
Social sciences, Social Welfare and Social Services
Length:
19,050 words
Illustration(s):
1

...immigration, refugees, and disabilities demand better and adequate research and intervention. Our newest models of practice—based on strength, resilience, and ecological perspectives—correspond closely with South Asian cultural values that help cope with and adjust to life's cycles in a myriad of ways. Counseling, especially adolescent and marital, is an area for practice that has not yet received the attention it demands. There is no other sphere of concerns that is more worrisome and at times even traumatic than raising young girls in a permissive...

View: