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bare life

Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben's concept for life that has been exposed to what he terms the structure of exception that constitutes contemporary biopower. The term originates in ...

Clooth-na-Bare

Clooth-na-Bare   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...Bare . W. B. Yeats's transmogrification of Cailleach Bhéirre . Unlike her predecessor in Irish tradition, Clooth-na-Bare is not a sovereignty figure. Instead, she seeks the deepest lake in which to drown her fairy life as she has grown weary of...

Baring-Gould, Sabine

Baring-Gould, Sabine (1834–1924)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...valuable and authoritative notes on the songs and often on the performers of bygone days. Baring-Gould left a mass of material when he died and his vast manuscripts are only now being identified and made available. DNB ; Bickford H. C. Dickinson , Sabine Baring-Gould: Squarson, Writer and Folklorist (1970); Harold Kirk-Smith , Now the Day is Over: The Life and Times of Sabine Baring-Gould (1997); William E. Purcell , Onward Christian Soldier: A Life of Sabine Baring-Gould ...

Vaughan Williams, Ralph

Vaughan Williams, Ralph (1872–1958)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...He was primarily interested in the tunes and often failed to note more than the first verse of a text. He did not try to note the whole repertoire of a singer, but concentrated on those he found interesting, and neither did he record any details of the singer's life or attitudes to singing beyond the bare name, age, and occupation. Collecting songs at that time was an arduous business, getting to remote villages (often by bicycle), spending hours searching out singers, noting tunes and words by hand in the open air or pub taprooms. The fact that Vaughan...

Heracles

Heracles (Europe)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

... Europe Or the Roman Hercules. The greatest of the heroes in Greek mythology. Son of the Theban Alcmene and Zeus. Heracles' life was shaped by the animosity of Hera, who pursued him with relentless hostility. She drove him mad so that he killed his own family. To expiate this dreadful crime he undertook the famous twelve labours. They were: the killing of the Nemean lion, a feat he achieved with his bare hands; the killing of the Hydra, a nine-headed dragon sacred to Hera; the capture of the Arcadian stag; the killing of the Erymanthian boar; the...

Kidson, Frank

Kidson, Frank (1855–1926)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...Frank ( 1855–1926 ). Born and living for most of his life in Leeds, he was proud of his home town and Yorkshire roots, and made a modest living as a journalist and author. Along with Lucy Broadwood and Sabine Baring-Gould he formed part of an important generation of pre- Folk Song Society song enthusiasts whose early collecting activities were undertaken more or less in isolation but whose individual efforts, and first publications, became both standard works and catalysts for the movement which included the formation of the Society in 1898 , and...

American myths

American myths   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

...the ground. A similar hero was Joe Magarac , a steelworker who made rails for the railroad by squeezing white-hot steel with his bare hands. Sometimes the “tall tales,” as they are called, were exaggerations of the deeds of real people, again to emphasize American values. John Henry was an African American railroad worker, a modern-day Herakles who was said to have won a drilling race against a steam drill at the cost of his life. Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett were real people whose lives were turned into tall tales. Crockett, a sometime congressman who...

curses

curses   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

.... Although invoking God's power to curse is generally done by the clergy, in previous centuries some lay people who believed themselves deeply wronged would utter a ritualized curse, kneeling on their bare knees in some public place in the presence of witnesses. Records of a Hereford diocesan court describe how in 1598 one man cursed another on his knees in the churchyard, ‘praying unto God that a heavy vengeance and a heavy plague might light on him and all his cattle’, and in 1614 a woman cursed a man she believed had killed her husband, ‘and prayed...

Minoan mythology

Minoan mythology   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

...and mountain sanctuaries of the island, suggest that the goddess herself, like her probable Middle Eastern and/or European Neolithic equivalents, was a nature deity associated with the creative essence of the earth , the cycles of nature and of life itself, including death. She is usually bare-breasted, wearing a flounced dress. Often she holds snakes; the familiar goddess companions. Her pubic area, like that of the old Neolithic goddess, is sometimes a stylized triangle. She is depicted in many contexts, leading some scholars to suppose a Cretan...

Sharp, Cecil James

Sharp, Cecil James (1859–1924)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...volume of his Folk Songs from Somerset appeared in 1904 . He joined the Folk-Song Society, which he publicly accused of being virtually moribund. After a very public disagreement with the Board of Education over the type of songs taught in schools, he published (with Sabine Baring-Gould) Folk-Songs for Schools in 1905 , and the immensely influential English Folk Song : Some Conclusions in 1907 . Sharp was approached, in 1906 , by Mary Neal , organizer of the Espérance Working Girls' Club, in St Pancras, London, which catered mainly for poor young...

Goddess

Goddess   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference

...she presented the city with an olive tree. Her importance to myth is emphasized by her prominence within the Greek triad and her appearance in other Indo-European traditions. Alinari/ Art Resource, New York. Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Naples, Italy [Leeming and Page ( 1994 ), Baring and Cashford,...

Mongán

Mongán   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...bargained to another man and an impostor sleeping with her. Of his three wives Mongán has the most sensual relations with Dub Lacha [Ir., black duck] , born on the same night as he to Fiachna Dub , a rival of Mongán's father Fiachna mac Báetáin. She is smitten with Mongán and bares her breasts to him; they become husband and wife. After Fiachna Dub kills Fiachna mac Báetáin and divides Ulster, Mongán wreaks vengeance upon him with the help of Brandub , king of Leinster . Brandub's price for this ‘friendship without refusal’ is Dub Lacha. She goes to live...

Herakles

Herakles   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to World Mythology

...by the oracle at Delphi , if he could accomplish the famous Twelve Labors for Eurystheus, through which the hero earned his name and represented the glory of Greece. The Twelve Labors are as follows: 1. The fight with the Nemean Lion . The hero killed the fierce lion with his bare hands. 2. The fight against the nine-headed Lernean Hydra . The Hydra was a favorite of his enemy Hera. Herakles burned off its eight mortal heads and buried the immortal one. 3. The capture of the Arcadian Stag . The stag had golden antlers and brass hooves. Herakles was...

Sioux Creation

Sioux Creation   Reference library

A Dictionary of Creation Myths

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...created world; nothing was wasted. But the earth was bare. It was a bald‐headed world. No life was on it yet; it was rock, a far‐shining crystal. The Great Unknown Power, the Grandfather Power, Unknowingly, was part of the sun and the sun was part of him. Unknowingly was seen‐unseen and had many forms. He spoke: “Ho! Aho! Now it is done. This is the Great Way of the Great Spirit talking.” And of the earth he said: “This will be my seat. This will be my backrest.” In the earth he planted the seed of life, a planting that took half a million eons of creation...

song

song   Quick reference

A Dictionary of English Folklore

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

...tonality was well ahead of its time (see JFSS 3 ( 1908 ), 147–242). It must also be stressed that their interest in modal tunes led the collectors to exaggerate their numerical importance, and a majority of the songs noted were in the standard major. See also BALLADS , SABINE BARING-GOULD , LUCY BROADWOOD , GEORGE BUTTERWORTH , F. J. CHILD , ENGLISH FOLK DANCE AND SONG SOCIETY , G. B. GARDINER , ANNE GILCHRIST , FOLK SONG SOCIETY , PERCY GRAINGER , HAMMOND BROTHERS, FRANK KIDSON , A. L. LLOYD , EWAN MaCCOLL , THOMAS PERCY , JOSEPH RITSON , ...

Fionn mac Cumhaill

Fionn mac Cumhaill   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Celtic Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004

...in virtually every body of water in Ireland, as well as many in Scotland and the Isle of Man, but more place-names are cited from Leinster than elsewhere. Numerous passes between mountains are thought to have been cut by his sword, and landmarks such as caves and ‘fingerstones’ (bare, vertical rocks) attributed to Fionn abound. At Glen Roy in Inverness-shire, Scotland, the ‘Parallel Roads’, horizontal markers from ancient glacial lakes, were attributed to Fionn. He is often seen as the victor in battles, but few are described in detail; the most extensive is...

DROWNING STRANGER, unlucky to save

DROWNING STRANGER, unlucky to save   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Superstitions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Society and culture, Customs and Traditions
Length:
242 words

...to risk the saving of a drowning man? Wot ye not, if you bring him to life again, he will be sure to do you some capital injury?’ 1851 MAYHEW London Labour 376. The Wreckers … who sometimes became possessed of rich silks, velvets, laces, &c. (not unfrequently murdering all the mariners cast on shore, and there was a convenient superstition among the wreckers, that it was unlucky to offer help to a drowning man) disposed of much of their plunder to the hawkers. 1876 S. BARING-GOULD Vicar of Morwenstow 106 [Cornwall] The cruel and covetous natives...

MARRIAGE: younger before elder

MARRIAGE: younger before elder   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Superstitions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Society and culture, Customs and Traditions
Length:
390 words

...elder 10th c. bc Genesis 29: 26. It must not be so done in our country, to give the younger before the firstborn. c. 1592 SHAKESPEARE Taming of the Shrew II i. She must have a husband, I must dance bare-foot on her wedding day. 1742 DELANY Correspondence (ed. Llanover, II 188) The eldest daughter was much disappointed that she should dance bare-foot, and desired her father to find out a match for her. 1787 GROSE Provincial Glossary Superstitions 62. If, in a family, the youngest daughter should be married before her elder sisters, they must...

SILVER ‘GARLAND’.

SILVER ‘GARLAND’.   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Superstitions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Society and culture, Customs and Traditions
Length:
285 words

...‘GARLAND’. 1546 P. VERGIL De Rerum Inventoribus I IV (tr. Langley) In Rome, the maner was that two chyldren should leade the bryde and another bare afore her a torche of whyte thorne … Whiche maner is vsed in Englande, sauyng in steade of the torche, there is borne here a basen of siluer or golde before. 1698 misson Voyageur en Angleterre ( 1791 , 307) On the first of May and the five or six days following, all the pretty young Country Girls that serve the Town with Milk, dress themselves up very neatly, and borrow abundance of Silver Plate,...

IMAGE/PICTURE used to injure or kill

IMAGE/PICTURE used to injure or kill   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Superstitions

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Society and culture, Customs and Traditions
Length:
1,284 words

...or her flesh. 1810 R. H. CROMEX Nithsdale Song 282 [Dumfries.] Figures were shaped in clay of those who had encroached on their [witches'] empire, which, when pierced with pins, conveyed by sympathetic feeling their maims and wounds to the person they represented. 1900 S. BARING-GOULD Book of Dartmoor 186 [Widecombe, c. 1850 ] She was caught on one occasion with a doll into which she was sticking pins and needles, in the hope and with the intent thereby of producing aches and cramps in a neighbour. On another occasion she laid a train of gunpowder on...

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