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bare life

Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben's concept for life that has been exposed to what he terms the structure of exception that constitutes contemporary biopower. The term originates in ...

Virgil

Virgil   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...and echoes, sometimes close, sometimes distant. In Troilus and Criseyde , book IV, for instance, when the despairing Troilus throws himself on his bed Chaucer adds (and adapts) a famous simile from Dante (‘and as in wynter leves ben biraft, | Ech after other, til the tre be bare’, 225–6) and it seems very likely that he was also thinking of its Virgilian antecedent used of the souls of the dead ( Aen. 6.309–12). There are other instances in this book. Other possible influences—on Chaucer's use of simile, or on the strongly visual element in his...

Friar, The

Friar, The   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...chancel marks the end of a night of passion (I.3656); the Host alludes to their Lenten preaching (IV.12); according to the Wife of Bath they have supplanted the fairies (III.864–81); in his Complaint to his Purse Chaucer laments that he is ‘shave as nye [closely, i.e. stripped bare of money] as any frere’. But the Friar of the General Prologue still has an important role to play. He irritates the Summoner and by telling a story about a wicked summoner, provokes the telling of a story against friars ( see Summoner's Tale ). Here we find many of the old...

Monk's Tale, The

Monk's Tale, The   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...inadequacies. It is too easy to underestimate The Monk's Tale . In fact, the story of Ugolino is excellently told, and a number of the others are good brief examples of ‘pitous tales’, and many have moments of lyrical eloquence. Even those very short items which seem almost bare chronicle entries or the simplest kind of exempla may well be deliberately designed to achieve a kind of detachment and to contribute to an underlying comic feeling of boredom by highlighting the cryptic style imposed by the limitations of an apparently endless catalogue. It is...

clothes

clothes   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to Chaucer

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005

...transformation (‘ye dide me streepe [strip] out of my povre weede, | And richely me cladden’), restores the clothes to Walter (‘heere agayn your clothyng I restoore’), and asks simply that she should be allowed to cover herself with a smock. And ‘in hir smok, with heed and foot al bare, | Toward hir fadre hous forth is she fare’. The ‘pitous’ scene is heightened by her father's attempt to cover her with hir ‘olde coote’ which has now become so old that he cannot get it on her body (862–917). Finally, when the ‘new queen’ arrives, Griselda (‘noght … abayst of...

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