You are looking at 1-12 of 12 entries  for:

  • All : bare life x
  • Linguistics x
clear all

View:

Overview

bare life

Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben's concept for life that has been exposed to what he terms the structure of exception that constitutes contemporary biopower. The term originates in ...

Durkheim, Émile

Durkheim, Émile (1858–1917)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Semiotics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
1,443 words

...form of social discipline. This line of inquiry reaches its fullest development in Durkheim's last book, The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life ( 1912 ). As in the earlier work, the emphasis is upon what Durkheim considers the simplest societies. In one sense, these societies offered the perfect testing grounds for a theory of society in general, since the basic forms would presumably be most clearly laid bare in these cultures that lack the accretions of many layers of cultural evolution. However, as a class Durkheim saw them as sui generis, since they...

interactionist analysis

interactionist analysis   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Semiotics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
1,757 words

...Blum and McHugh present a theorization of self‐reflection irreducible to a descriptive inventory of this practice's historic conventions in the human sciences. Since self‐reflection is the very condition of the existence and development of the human sciences, Blum and McHugh lay bare the ground of their inquiry by constructing an ideal speaker. Their idealized version of self‐reflection as rational, social action is the limit toward which their inquiry is oriented. Self‐reflection is for them a social action undertaken by an ideal speaker or theorist in...

Form of Address

Form of Address   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to the English Language (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018
Subject:
Language reference, History of English, Linguistics
Length:
1,919 words

...be used at all; forms of address tend instead to be terms of endearment ( baby, darling, honey ) or expressions of derision ( dickhead, idiot, stupid ), usually hostile and dismissive, but sometimes affectionate. At the impersonal end, such forms of address as sir and titles (bare or with surname) may be used: Excuse me, sir/Sir ; Doctor ( Kildare ), do you have a moment, please? ; Follow your orders, Captain ( Bligh ). All the forms of address discussed below occur at various points on this continuum. Names and titles With the loss of its th -forms...

Peirce, Charles Sanders

Peirce, Charles Sanders (1839–1914)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Semiotics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
3,728 words

...Peirce also introduced his Harvard audience to the most recent variants of his metaphysical vocabulary of triadic forms: Thing, Representation, and Form; and Signs, Copies, and Symbols. By Form , he referred to the way in which a thing can be represented, while a thing was the bare “it” of the representation, and “representations” were unities of Thing and Form insofar as they have singular identities, as do Things, but also refer beyond themselves to Things themselves. Representations are always known directly because there is nothing to know about them...

Lacan, Jacques

Lacan, Jacques (1901–1981)   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Semiotics

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
3,413 words

...pure signified, purged of all mediation through the signifier. What analysands can access, through the circulation of certain signifiers between themselves and the analyst, is a sense of an earlier attachment of a signifier to a signified. These attachments are for Lacan a kind of bare minimum for psychic survival. They are points where the flux of meaning is held in place so that human beings can preserve their sanity. Thus, while Lacan's concept of the signifying chain appeared to promise a psycholinguistic theory of infinite semiosis, the idea of the points...

Poetry

Poetry   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Rhetoric

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
6,213 words

...the ways in which they use the patterns and resources of language. For this reason, discussions of the figures are often absorbed into manuals for writing poetry. Rhetoric also encourages analysis of the structure of speeches and poems. Since poems do not usually conform to the bare four-part structure of the classical oration, rhetoricians and commentators are obliged to analyze the functioning of different types of structure peculiar to individual poems, as Dante did in the Vita Nuova ( c.1292 ), commenting on the divisions of a number of his youthful...

Iconography

Iconography   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Rhetoric

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006
Subject:
Language reference, Linguistics
Length:
4,548 words
Illustration(s):
3

...In the longest, she is symbolized by a beautiful young woman, because the ancients depicted Mercury as young, pleasing, and beardless. Eloquence wears a golden crown over a helmet, a breastplate, and sword over a purple dress; her arms are bare; in her right hand she holds a staff and in her left a thunderbolt. The bare arms signify the delicacy of her words, whereas the armor indicates the foundation of reason and knowledge without which eloquence is weak and helpless. The thunderbolt, deriving from Demosthenes' epithet, alludes to the sublime force of...

philosophy

philosophy  

(Greek, love of knowledge or wisdom)The study of the most general and abstract features of the world and categories with which we think: mind, matter, reason, proof, truth, etc. In philosophy, the ...
Minimalist Program

Minimalist Program   Reference library

International Encyclopedia of Linguistics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
3,493 words

...in least-effort terms. Second, it is observed that the faculty for language (FL) is one cognitive module among many, and that its interactions with these other modules are likely to place substantive restrictions on FL if the latter is well designed. We can call such conditions “bare output conditions.” The notion that grammars are well designed—both in efficiently meeting the interpretive (“legibility”) requirements of the other cognitive systems with which FL interacts, and in exploiting computational procedures with a least-effort flavor—marks Minimalist...

Arawakan Languages

Arawakan Languages   Reference library

International Encyclopedia of Linguistics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
4,122 words
Illustration(s):
3

...Içana and Ayarí Rivers who speak Baniwa: Hohodené, Kadaupuritana, Sucuriyu-Tapuya, Siusy-Tapuya, Irá-Tapuya, Kawá-Tapuya, Waliperedakenai. In Venezuela: 407 speakers. Amazonas, between the Curipaco and the Guarequena, along the Colombian border. Related to Carútana and Curripaco. Baré: also called Barawana, Barauna, Barauana, Ihini, Arihini, Maldavaca, Cunipusana, Yavita, Mitua. Formerly spoken in Venezuela. Colombian border in extreme southwest, Amazonas, along the upper Rio Negro from Brazil-Venezuela border to the Casiquiare Canal, Maroa. Replaced by...

Learnability

Learnability   Reference library

International Encyclopedia of Linguistics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
4,183 words

...space, the set of options from which a learner must choose. Thus, it is natural to look to linguistic theory, which describes the nature of the space of possible human languages, as a source of insight into what makes the efficient learning of human languages possible. At a bare minimum, linguistic theory can provide a search space of possible grammars for the learner to explore. By itself, this does little more than provide a more precise statement of a learning problem. One of the first grammar-space properties that was proposed as beneficial to...

Reconstruction

Reconstruction   Reference library

International Encyclopedia of Linguistics (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Linguistics
Length:
10,144 words
Illustration(s):
8

...work have been the numerous semantic reconstructions in the Amerind area, almost all north of Mexico (e.g. Hockett 1948 , Dyen and Aberle 1974 , Walker 1975 , Mithun 1984 ); and we can expect even more as the poetic, often highly formulaic substructure of Amerind texts is laid bare. Most reconstruction so far has been densely intercalated with poetics because of the maximally poetic character of the texts in question—not just Homer and the Rig Veda , but the Popol Vuh and Native American myths and tales (Schmidt 1967 , Watkins 1995 , Mallory and Adams ...

View: