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Overview

Establishment

Subject: Religion

In ecclesiastical usage, the recognition by the State of a particular Church as that of the State. In OT Judaism and in much of the ancient world, religious observance was part of the ...

soda pop

soda pop   Quick reference

The Diner’s Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...term, first recorded in 1863 , for a sweet carbonated drink, as originally made from soda water and flavoured syrup. In everyday use it is generally shortened to soda, which forms the basis of various associated terms, notably soda fountain, denoting a counter or establishment where soda pop, sundaes, and ice cream are dispensed by a soda jerk (a seller of such wares). Vanilla-flavoured soda pop is termed cream soda...

Oreo

Oreo   Quick reference

The Diner’s Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...name (invented by the manufacturer) of a type of chocolate biscuit with a white cream filling, originally produced in the US in 1912. In the 1960s it came to be used as a derogatory term for an African American who is seen, especially by other blacks, as part of the white establishment: ‘Trouble is Negroes been programmed by white folks to believe their products are inferior. We’ve developed into a generation of Oreos—black on the outside, white on the inside’, Harper’s Magazine ( 1969...

koumiss

koumiss   Quick reference

The Diner’s Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...supply, even in those days of horse-drawn transport, so cow's milk koumiss was made instead, a sovereign remedy for anaemia, phthisis, and ‘catarrhal infections’: ‘The koumiss cure is growing greatly in popularity.…Sometimes patients spend six or seven summers at the koumiss establishments’, Pall Mall Gazette ( 1884...

chip

chip   Quick reference

The Diner’s Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...in fast-food outlets (in the late 1980s Buxted changed the name of their ready-meal ‘Chicken and Chips’ to ‘Chicken and Fries’). Meanwhile a minor outflanking move on British usage has been made by French pommes frites , or their abbreviation frites , in upmarket establishments where the chip would be infra dig ( see also pont-neuf potatoes ). To complicate matters further, in Australian English chips are crisps, and chips are hot chips . In Indian English chips are known as finger chips. See also oven chip . The chip's main role...

claret

claret   Quick reference

The Diner’s Dictionary (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...varieties which produce a range of fairly undistinguished wines, mainly white (the best, and best-known, is Clairette de Die , a usually sparkling wine made in the Rhône valley). And a wine called clairet , pale red verging on rosé, is still made in Bordeaux. Claret 's establishment in English as unequivocally a word for ‘red wine’ is confirmed by its metaphorical use for ‘blood’, particularly as drawn by fisticuffs; the usage now has a very dated air, conjuring up the bare-knuckle fights of the eighteenth century, but it dates back to the early...

Algae

Algae   Reference library

The Oxford Book of Health Foods

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009

...health food shops. Seaweeds The term ‘kelp’ is applied to a number of seaweed species. In many parts of the world seaweeds, often dried, are used directly in food – as vegetables, and in salads and soups. They are sometimes sold in health food shops, supermarkets, and similar establishments. The greatest usage is in the Orient; e.g. in Japan some 50 species are utilized. Phycocolloids (carbohydrates) such as agars, alginates, and carrageenans are extracted from seaweeds and used as thickeners and stabilizers in a vast array of foods, including canned...

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