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Gurzil Dispels the Darkness

Subject: Religion

(Libya) Gurzil, the sun god, was worshiped among the Huwwara of Tripolitania well into the eleventh century, long after the Arab conquest. This deity was a protector, a guide, ...

Consumerism

Consumerism   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
3,809 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...toys, games, and jigsaw puzzles for children had become common. Not least, diet was more varied, with a greater range of fruit and vegetables. People owned more changes of clothes, particularly with the growing availability of cheaper calicoes and cottons. Efficient oil-lamps dispelled the age-old stygian gloom; gas lighting arrived with the new century, soon to be followed by railway travel and the electric telegraph. Outside the home, urban space was being spruced up. In many towns, straight, well-demarcated streets replaced the labyrinthine old warrens of...

Literary Theory

Literary Theory   Reference library

An Oxford Companion to the Romantic Age

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
History, modern history (1700 to 1945), Literature
Length:
4,935 words
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

...to Peacock, ‘a semi-barbarian in a civilized community’ because his craft belongs in a society where imagination and feeling are the only index to reality. Where Wordsworth turns to the poet to heal wounds inflicted by civilization, Peacock turns to the scientist and historian to dispel the merely subjective pronouncements of the poet. For Peacock, the literature of knowledge acts on the literature of power as an agent of disenchantment, a position which * Byron sketched in his suppressed Preface to Don Juan ( 1819–24 ) and put into practice in the rest of...

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