You are looking at 1-10 of 24 entries  for:

  • All : dispel x
  • Classical studies x
clear all

View:

Overview

Gurzil Dispels the Darkness

Subject: Religion

(Libya) Gurzil, the sun god, was worshiped among the Huwwara of Tripolitania well into the eleventh century, long after the Arab conquest. This deity was a protector, a guide, ...

dispel

dispel vt   Quick reference

Pocket Oxford Latin Dictionary: English-Latin (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Bilingual Dictionary
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Bilingual dictionaries, Classical studies
Length:
6 words
Wroxeter

Wroxeter   Reference library

Adam Rogers

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...structural remains, including the wall of the baths - basilica (the ‘Old Work’), and the post-Roman sequence of rectangular timber buildings identified through meticulous excavations. Recent research indicates that the settlement became an important local power base; it dispels former views of a violent end, and suggests that Wroxeter was probably abandoned in the early 8th century . Adam Rogers R. White and P. Barker , Wroxeter: Life and Death of a Roman City (1998)....

cross in art

cross in art   Reference library

Dorothy Verkerk and Oliver Nicholson

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...cross in art The sign of the Cross had the power to dispel demons ( Lactantius , Mort . 10; Inst . IV, 27). Crosses were commonly represented on such personal items as lamps , pottery , amulets , seals , jewellery , and clothing to invoke protection against evil and to attract good fortune. Sarcophagi , wall paintings, and gold glass embedded in tombs displayed crosses in hope of the resurrection. The Church utilized it in every aspect of worship: in processional crosses, church furniture , reliquaries , and architectural sculpture . Imperial...

draught animals

draught animals   Reference library

Michael Decker

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...were used to pull ploughs and to lift water. Horses were less used for these purposes because they are smaller, but they were much used in land transport and former scholarly doubt about Romans having the technology to harness horses for draught purposes has been largely dispelled. Mules were especially important; they were prized for their high endurance and ability to tolerate coarser food than finer Mediterranean horse breeds. Donkeys were commonly used to pull carts with light loads, while mules drew wagons with heavier burdens, as in the depiction...

Persian literature

Persian literature   Reference library

Touraj Daryaee

The Oxford Dictionary of Late Antiquity

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2018

...the ancient Mesopotamian debate poetry recited during banquets. The debate is about which of these two (the date or the goat) is more useful, and their products are enumerated. Other texts are from the early Islamic period, such as the important Shkand i Gumanig Wizar ( Doubt Dispelling Explanation ), that recount the supremacy of Zoroastrian theology and the deficiency of such religions as those of the Fatalists ( Dahris ), Manichaeans , Christians, Jews, and Muslims. The author systematically tackles the tenets of these religions and sometimes quotes...

Heroön

Heroön   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Classical Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Classical studies
Length:
1,011 words

...(Theseus at Athens , Anios at Delos ), legislator (Lykourgos at Sparta ) or soldier (Brasidas at Amphipolis ). Each city hoped, through an appropriate cult, to capture after the hero’s death the beneficial, semi-divine influence he had exercised while alive, and sometimes to dispel the evil influence of a vengeful hero by funerary honours. For example, at Temesa in southern Italy a drunken sailor who had raped a virgin was stoned to death and left unburied by the furious population, and at Delphi the inhabitants killed Neoptolemos in the Sanctuary of...

Romulus and Remus

Romulus and Remus   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,107 words
Illustration(s):
1

...earliest mention of Romulus’ deification is a fragment from Ennius: “Romulus lives for ever in the sky with the gods that gave him birth” ( Annales F 110). Cicero ( De republica 2.20) reports a story that Romulus’ deification as Quirinus was proclaimed by Proculus Julius to dispel the suspicion that the senators were responsible for Romulus’ death. The tradition that Romulus was torn in pieces by senators appears in Livy (1.16) and Dionysius (2.56), with the latter commenting on Romulus’ tyrannical behavior. Both authors give an alternative version that...

Velleius Paterculus

Velleius Paterculus   Reference library

A. J. Woodman

The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2014
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,041 words

...conclusion to his work (2. 131), is arguably a recognition of the political crisis of ad 29 , while the treatment of Seianus, which is not a panegyric of the man but a defence of his elevation by Tiberius, betrays some of the very unease which it seems designed to dispel. Velleius, like Polybius , travelled widely (cf. 2. 101. 3); he was a senator, like Sallust and Tacitus) , and held magisterial office; like Thucydides he witnessed and took part in a significant number of the events he describes (cf. 2. 104. 3, 106. 1, 113. 3, 118. 1). He...

Sextus Empiricus

Sextus Empiricus   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
2,050 words

...source of the Pyrrhonist's final liberation from anxiety. Tranquility is the goal, belief (and the wish to believe) the disease, the Pyrrhonian activity leading to suspension (and preserving it) the cure. Involuntary affections like cold, hunger, and pain will not be dispelled by skeptical arguments, but the skeptic will tolerate them more easily than the layman and the dogmatist do: the skeptic's affection will be moderate ( metriopatheia ) because he will not add unnecessary belief-induced mental distress to those natural and inescapable...

Augustine

Augustine (354–430ce)   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
2,001 words

...bishop, Valerius, was petitioning Carthage to have Augustine consecrated as his co-bishop, again in defiance of canon law. He became the sole bishop of Hippo in 396 . Many Christians, including a few of his own communion, questioned the authenticity of his conversion. In part to dispel suspicions of crypto-Manichaeism, Augustine narrated his conversion in a manner designed to evoke Saul's conversion on the road to Damascus. He also made the radical claim that a requirement for Christian conversion was the renunciation of fictional classical literature (prose...

View: