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a fortiori

Subject: Philosophy

(Latin, from the stronger)

Phrase used for ‘all the more’ or ‘even more so’: if all donkeys bray, then a fortiori all young donkeys bray.

Topos

Topos   Reference library

O. B. Hardison and E. H. Behler

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017

... (Gr., literally, “place, region” ; pl. topoi ) . A conventionalized expression or passage in a text that comes to be used as a resource for the composition of subsequent texts. The term is first used in a technical sense in cl. rhet., where it is treated under invention and refers to a standard line of argument based on generally accepted logical probabilities such as “possible or impossible” or “greater or lesser” or “post hoc ergo propter hoc” or “a fortiori,” as when it is argued, e.g., that, since Achilles gave in to wrath, it is not surprising...

Furor Poeticus

Furor Poeticus   Reference library

R. Falco

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2017
Subject:
Literature, Literary studies - poetry and poets
Length:
1,579 words

... “imitation,” rejected the notion of inspiration as a mysterious “gift” because it diminished the importance of labor and application. In the romantic period, however, furor poeticus was seen as a means of liberating the imagination from conformity (Burwick), although, as interest in clinical madness grew, it tended to be linked to insanity rather than divinity or cl. enthousiasmos . The idea of the “vatic” also became secularized, although it was not associated a fortiori with madness; as a poetic posture, it continued to appeal to poets as late as ...

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