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Hall, Everett Wesley

Hall, Everett Wesley (1901–60)   Reference library

The Dictionary of Modern American Philosophers

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
1,254 words

...) statements. Where “A” refers to some universal, “A is good” reduces to “For any x , if x exemplifies A, then x ought to exemplify A.” Normatives cannot be reduced to value statements because value statements fail to capture the “requiredness to be exemplified” of normative statements. Hall rejected the idea of a presuppositionless philosophy and held firmly to the belief that all philosophy relied on a categorical framework in some form. Central to his thinking was that “There are no categorically self-sufficient and self-justifying philosophical...

White, Morton Gabriel

White, Morton Gabriel (1917–)   Reference library

The Dictionary of Modern American Philosophers

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
2,703 words

... corporatists, while he calls Quine a total or holistic corporatist. While White’s holism is less comprehensive than Quine ’s when it comes to individual testing, White insists that the limited bodies of belief which are tested may contain a mixture of descriptive and normative statements, and in What Is and What Ought To Be Done he gives several examples of such mixtures. Another very important point in What Is and What Ought To Be Done is an extension of the notion of evidence to include not only sensory experience, but a special sort of moral feeling...

fact–value distinction

fact–value distinction   Reference library

The Continuum Encyclopedia of British Philosophy

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
1,085 words

...from non-moral premises, that further elaboration would be needed if statements about facts were to be used as support for statements about values. R. M. Hare called this ‘Hume's Law’. More generally the distinction between is and ought, or between positive and normative statements, is often invoked in relation to the fact/value distinction, with fact accordingly conceived as what is the case and value as what ought to be the case. Hume's Law is not to be confused with another famous idea, due to G. E. Moore . In his Principia Ethica ( 1903 ),...

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