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Second Sophistic

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Adrianus (Hadrianus)

Adrianus (Hadrianus)  

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Of Tyre (c. ad 113–93), sophist, pupil of Herodes Atticus; held the chairs of rhetoric at Athens and Rome. One short declamation attributed to him survives. See Second Sophistic.Philostratus ...
Ailios Aristeides

Ailios Aristeides  

Rhetorician of the Second Sophistic; born 117 or 129, died ca.189.In the discussion of the relative values of philosophy and rhetoric, Aristeides took a clear stand against Plato and ...
Alciphron

Alciphron  

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(2nd or 3rd cent. ad),sophist (see Second Sophistic), whose Letters, supposedly written by Athenians of the 4th cent. bc (fishermen, farmers, ‘parasites’, courtesans (hetairai) attest his wide ...
Antiquity

Antiquity  

The Greco-Roman heritage was a powerful tradition, which, together with that of the Bible, influenced Byz. culture. From antiquity Byz. inherited the Greek Language, the system of education, Roman ...
Archaism

Archaism  

Or classicism, was a current in highstyle Byz. literature inherited from the Second Sophistic, where it originated. It encompassed both language and style (rhetorical figures, etc.) and the contents ...
Aristides, Publius Aelius

Aristides, Publius Aelius  

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(ad 117–after 181),sophist (see second sophistic) and man of letters. Born in Mysia, he studied in Athens and Pergamum. Aged 26, he suffered the first of a long series of illnesses, which ended his ...
Asianism

Asianism  

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The Greek orators of Asia Minor during the Hellenistic period developed a new style of oratory, marked by wordplay, emotional effect, bombast, and rhythm; some idea of it can be ...
Athenaeus

Athenaeus  

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(fl. c.ad 200),of Naucratis. His only extant work, Deipnosophists (‘Doctors at Dinner’), was probably completed soon after the death of Commodus in 192. It belongs to the learned variety of the ...
Callistratus

Callistratus  

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(3rd or 4th cent. ad),a sophist (see Second Sophistic) who wrote Descriptions of fourteen statues (including Lysippus' Opportunity), in imitation of the Images of Philostratus of Lemnos.TextC. ...
Claudius Atticus Herodes, Tiberius

Claudius Atticus Herodes, Tiberius  

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‘Herodes Atticus’ (c. ad 101–177), Athenian sophist and benefactor of Greek cities, consul 143; friend of Marcus Aurelius, whom he taught (along with Verus). A controversial public figure, he ...
Claudius Charax, Aulus

Claudius Charax, Aulus  

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Of Pergamum, Greek historian and Roman senator. He held a legionary command in Britain, governed Cilicia, and was suffect consul in ad 147 (L'Année Épigraphique 1961, 320). A well-known figure ...
Curiatius Maternus

Curiatius Maternus  

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(RE 7)Roman dramatist. The host and main speaker in Tacitus' Dialogus, he champions poetry against oratory and explains the decay of eloquence by appeal to historical circumstances. His (lost) ...
Damaskios

Damaskios  

(Δαμάσκιος), or Damaskios Diadochos, last scholarch of the Academy of Athens; born Damascus ca.460?, died after 538. Damaskios both studied and taught rhetoric at Alexandria, also studying Plato with ...
Daphnis and Chloe

Daphnis and Chloe  

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A Greek pastoral romance written by an otherwise unknown ‘Longus’ sometime between the 2nd and 6th cents ad. It describes in formal style the a wakening of passion in its two protagonists. Amyot's ...
declamation

declamation  

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Was the main means employed by rhetors to train their pupils for public speaking. It was invented by the Greeks, who brought it to Rome and the Roman world generally. Its developed forms were known ...
Dio Cocceianus

Dio Cocceianus  

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Later called Chrysostom (c.ad 40/50—after 110), Greek orator and popular philosopher. Born of wealthy family in Prusa in Bithynia, Dio began a career as a rhetorician at Rome, but soon fell under the ...
Dio of Prusa

Dio of Prusa  

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(c. ad 40/50–after 110),Greek orator and popular philosopher. Born of wealthy family in Prusa (mod. Bursa, NW Turkey) in Bithynia, Dio began a career as a rhetorician at Rome ...
Dionysius of Halicarnassus

Dionysius of Halicarnassus  

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Greek critic and historian, lived and taught rhetoric at Rome, arriving ‘at the time Augustus put an end to the civil war’, and publishing the first part of his Roman Antiquities (Rhōmaïkē ...
Encyclopedias and Dictionaries

Encyclopedias and Dictionaries  

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We can hardly avoid grouping together these two categories of reference works because the distinction between them was only worked out after the fact, as ancient scholarship evolved. For our ...
Epistolography

Epistolography  

Or the art of writing letters, a genre of Byz. literature akin to rhetoric, popular with the intellectual elite. Copious examples survive from all periods, in more than 150 published ...

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