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actuaire

actuaire  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
(French), 18th- and early 19th-century open transport for troops, propelled by both oars and sails.
actuairole

actuairole  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
(French), a small galley propelled by oars and used as a transport for troops up and down the French coast in the 18th and early 19th centuries.
Alfred the Great

Alfred the Great  

(849–99)King of Wessex (871–99). Alfred's military resistance saved south‐west England from Viking occupation. He negotiated the treaty giving the Danelaw to the Norsemen (886). A great reformer, he ...
Argonauts

Argonauts  

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Overview Page
In Greek legend a band of 50 heroes who undertook a sea expedition to bring back the Golden Fleece from Colchis on the farther shore of the Euxine (Black) Sea. It was led by Jason, who had the task ...
backing

backing  

Anticlockwise shift of the direction of the wind. The reverse change is called veering.
barge

barge  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Probably from the Latin barca, which would make it the equivalent of bark or barque. In its oldest use (1), this is probably the case, as it was the name given to a small seagoing ship with sails, ...
bireme

bireme  

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History
A galley having two banks of oars. It was invariably fitted with a metal ram and was used, particularly in battles at sea, in the Mediterranean until the mid-17th century.See also warfare at sea.See ...
boat

boat  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
There are not many references to boats in the OT since the Hebrews were not a seafaring people; indeed the sea had connotations of evil (Ps. 107: 26; cf. Rev. 21: 1). However, in the NT boats are ...
caique

caique  

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History
From the Turkish kaik, a boat or skiff.1 In its strict meaning it refers to the light boats propelled by one or two oars and used in Turkish waters, particularly the Bosporus, but it was also used as ...
capping

capping  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
A strip of wood, usually of Canadian elm, fitted to the top of the gunwale or washboard of wooden boats to strengthen it. In boats fitted to take oars, it is pierced at intervals to take crutches or ...

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