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Gurzil Dispels the Darkness

Subject: Religion

(Libya) Gurzil, the sun god, was worshiped among the Huwwara of Tripolitania well into the eleventh century, long after the Arab conquest. This deity was a protector, a guide, ...

appeal

appeal   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
129 words

...contexts, appeal comes via Old French from Latin appellare ‘to address, accost, call upon’. Peal [LME] is a shortening of appeal, perhaps from the call to prayers of a ringing bell. The base of appeal is Latin pellere ‘to drive’, found also in compel ‘drive together’; dispel ‘drive apart’; expel ‘drive out’; impel ‘drive towards’; and impulsive ; propel ‘drive forwards’; repel ‘drive back’, all Late Middle English. It is also the source of the pulse [ME] that you can feel on your wrist and is related to push [ME] . The other kind of...

Belfast Blitz

Belfast Blitz   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Irish Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...Blitz . The German air raids on Belfast in April and May 1941 , which dispelled the illusion that Northern Ireland was immune from air attack. On 15 April, a week after the first raid in which 13 people had been killed, German bombers dropped a hundred tons of bombs, damaging 56,000 houses, killing 745 people and injuring 1500. (Two parachutemines fell in Derry that same night, killing 15 and wrecking two houses.) In a gesture of solidarity Éamon de Valera dispatched 13 fire engines from Dublin and east coast towns, but the Stormont war cabinet was...

Bes

Bes   Quick reference

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2006

...in Egyptian mythology, a grotesque god depicted as having short legs, an obese body, and an almost bestial face, who dispelled evil...

Break

Break   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...To complete the greatest or hardest part of a difficult task. Break the bank, To To ruin financially, especially through a successful gambling move. ‘To break the bank at Monte Carlo’ is a more colourful version of the phrase. Break the ice, To To be the first to do something; to dispel the stiffness and reserve of a first meeting or conversation. The allusion is to the breaking of a path in the ice to enable a ship to proceed. Break the mould, To To change from one’s usual habits. In former times an artist would break the mould of a high-quality cast so that it...

Chalcedony

Chalcedony   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable (19 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...] A precious stone, consisting of half-transparent quartz: so called from Chalcedon, in Asia Minor, where it was first found. Its chief varieties are agate, carnelian, cat’s -eye, chrysoprase, flint, hornstone, onyx, plasma, and sard. Albertus Magnus (book i. chap. 2) says: ‘It dispels illusions and all vain imaginations. If hung about the neck as a charm, it is a defence against enemies, and keeps the body healthful and vigorous. from Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable ( 1896...

Cock

Cock 1   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Irish Phrase & Fable

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...1 . In the Irish house and farm, the cock was treated with great respect: because he was believed to have the power to dispel the power of the supernatural or Otherworld with his first crow at dawn, he himself was thought to possess a share of that supernatural power. Cocks were also believed to have the power of prophecy. According to the place or the time they crowed (other than at dawn) a visitor would arrive or someone would die in the town-land. They were never killed when they had outlived their usefulness, but instead let go in a wood. At that time...

discuss

discuss   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
39 words

...A investigate, decide XIV; examine by argument XV ; B †dispel, disperse XIV. f. discuss- , pp. stem of L. discutere dash to pieces, disperse, dispel, in Rom. investigate; f. DIS- 1 + quatere shake. So discussion XIV. — OF. —...

dispel

dispel   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
10 words

... XVII. — L. dispellere , f. DIS- 1 + pellere ...

dissipate

dissipate   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Language reference, History of English
Length:
46 words

...scatter, dispel XV; squander; distract XVII. f. pp. stem of L. dissipāre , f. DIS- 1 + * supāre , * sipāre throw; see -ATE 3 . So dissipation dissolution XV; †dispersion XVI; squandering XVII; distraction of mind XVIII, (hence) frivolous diversion, (passing into) dissolute living XVIII. — (O)F. or...

Glyndebourne

Glyndebourne   Reference library

Brewer's Dictionary of Modern Phrase & Fable (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011

...summer event. A new and larger auditorium opened in 1994 , but seats are still in short supply, and this, together with a suspicion that many of the black-tie audience are more interested in their alfresco interval supper in the grounds than in the music, has not helped to dispel the elitist image of opera in Britain. Nor has the helipad. For those who prefer their Puccini without a picnic, Glyndebourne Touring Opera presents productions in theatres around the country in the winter...

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