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Gurzil Dispels the Darkness

Subject: Religion

(Libya) Gurzil, the sun god, was worshiped among the Huwwara of Tripolitania well into the eleventh century, long after the Arab conquest. This deity was a protector, a guide, ...

Bunge, William

Bunge, William (1928)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
101 words

...manifesto for geography’s post-1945 Quantitative Revolution . By 1968 , however, he argued for a more political form of scholarship devoted to bettering the lives of the poor and disadvantaged. His Detroit ( 1968 ) and Toronto ( 1973 ) geographical expeditions were designed to dispel the ignorance (as he and co-expeditionists saw it) that most North Americans had about poor inner-city neighbourhoods ( see Detroit Geographical Expedition and Institute...

Less Economically Developed Country

Less Economically Developed Country   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
128 words

...Economically Developed Country ( LEDC ) A low-income or economically poorer country; the term is generally applied to countries of Africa, Asia, and Latin America. The inclusion of the adjective ‘economically’ is designed to dispel the notion that such countries are somehow backward or primitive relative to others. LEDC has replaced earlier terms such as Least or Less Developed Country over the past 30 years. The World Bank categorizes countries according to their per capita Gross National Income (GNI) into four groups (see Table 1). Table 1 World Bank...

local-global relations

local-global relations   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Human Geography

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013
Subject:
Social sciences, Human Geography
Length:
266 words

...planet-spanning connections and flows ( see place ). The sixth and final position is that local and global refer not to locations but to processes, i.e. of localization and globalization operating simultaneously ( see glocalization ). J. K. Gibson-Graham’s intention is to dispel the common idea that global = powerful/active/masculine and local = weak/passive/ feminine, although in practice it proves difficult not to fall into this binary trap. See also transnationalism . Reference Gibson-Graham, J. K. (2002), ‘Beyond global vs. local’ in Herod, A. ...

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