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Gurzil Dispels the Darkness

Subject: Religion

(Libya) Gurzil, the sun god, was worshiped among the Huwwara of Tripolitania well into the eleventh century, long after the Arab conquest. This deity was a protector, a guide, ...

Raj Krishna

Raj Krishna   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Economics in India (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012

...to be quite influential as it demonstrated that the price elasticities of supply for farmers in India were not very different from those estimated for developed countries (for similar crops over similar periods of time). This work ( Krishna 1963 ) was quite definitive in dispelling the notion that supply functions in underdeveloped countries were relatively unresponsive or even vertical. Indian peasants, it seemed, responded to price incentives much like farmers in the West. Returning to India, Raj Krishna joined the Institute of Economic Growth in Delhi....

Exports and Export Policy

Exports and Export Policy   Reference library

The New Oxford Companion to Economics in India (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012

...of the export-promotion strategy is related to its growth-augmenting impact. The earlier export pessimism, which was apprehensive of export-led growth of primary products because of low elasticity of demand and the resultant decline in terms of trade, has been convincingly dispelled thanks to the success of some of the Asian countries in the last few decades. Major expansion of manufacturing exports has been strongly correlated with growth in productivity and diversity of export items. Product differentiation, economies of scale, and growth in...

Hildreth, Richard

Hildreth, Richard (1807–65)   Reference library

The Biographical Dictionary of American Economists

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Social sciences, Economics
Length:
300 words

...American consul in the Austrian city of Trieste, and held the post until 1864 , when he resigned on health grounds. He retired to Italy, where he died. Contemporary reviewers found Hildreth's work to be dry and lacking in originality, and a modern reading does little to dispel this view. His primary contribution to economics is his The History of Banks ( 1837 ), later reworked as Banks, Banking, and Paper Currencies ( 1840 ). Writing against those Jacksonians who desired to either restrict private banking or abolish it altogether, Hildreth instead...

Wakefield, Edward

Wakefield, Edward (1774–1854)   Reference library

The Biographical Dictionary of British Economists

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Social sciences, Economics
Length:
589 words

...But he argues that the government ought to guide and lead Ireland, not attempt to control it by force. In particular, he argues for investment in education to raise the poor from their misery and give them the capacity to develop and flourish. In time, rising prosperity would dispel the threat of rebellion, as people would see that their own interests lay with England. Rather than planting English colonies in Ireland, the government ought to try to attempt to develop the latent potential of the country and its people. BIBLIOGRAPHY An Account of Ireland,...

Postan, Michael Moisey

Postan, Michael Moisey (1899–1981)   Reference library

The Biographical Dictionary of British Economists

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Social sciences, Economics
Length:
1,288 words

...Trade in the Fifteenth Century ( 1933 ). Postan later revisited the subject in Medieval Trade and Finance ( 1973 ). Together, Power and Postan did much to indicate the volume and complexity of medieval trade and the comparative sophistication of financial instruments, and to dispel the notion put forward by earlier writers that trade in the Middle Ages consisted largely of luxury goods in low volumes. Power and Postan’s work showed how even at this early stage, trade was making a considerable contribution to the economy. Following the Second World War,...

Angell, Norman

Angell, Norman (1872–1967)   Reference library

The Biographical Dictionary of British Economists

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Social sciences, Economics
Length:
2,515 words

...the famous dismissal of honour put into the mouth of Sir John Falstaff. Neither Angell or any other political economist can ‘refute’ such codes of honour. Indeed, Angell was careful to point out that he did not regard economic rivalries as the only cause of war, but wanted to dispel them as a contributory factor. Nor was he worried by the assertion that ‘you can’t change human nature’. He did not dispute this, but argued that human behaviour could be changed by the equivalent of a Hobbesian sovereign in international affairs. He gave numerous instances where...

Ricardo, David

Ricardo, David (1772–1823)   Reference library

The Biographical Dictionary of British Economists

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Social sciences, Economics
Length:
4,459 words

...bundles of heterogenous commodities could be made commensurable. The new theory replicated the important finding that the rate of ‘profits would be high or low in proportion as wages were low or high’ ( Works , vol. I: 111). The labour theory of value thus enabled Ricardo to dispel the idea deriving from Adam Smith ’s ‘adding-up theory’ of prices ( Sraffa ) that wages and die rate of profits could move independently of one another, and to establish the constraint binding changes in the two distributive variables, given the system of production. It was an...

Cereals

Cereals   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Economic History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Social sciences, Economics
Length:
3,041 words

...a blend called muncorn, which in 1801 was recorded spasmodically in Shropshire. Cereal blends were also known as blendings and blendcorn. It is not unusual to read in texts that by 1800 almost the entire population of England and Wales subsisted on wheat. The 1801 survey dispels that belief, though it does show some fairly clear lines of cereal use. Wheat was the chief crop and therefore the bread grain of preference in almost every county of south, southwest, east, and midland England. In northern England, north of and including Staffordshire and...

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