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Gurzil Dispels the Darkness

Subject: Religion

(Libya) Gurzil, the sun god, was worshiped among the Huwwara of Tripolitania well into the eleventh century, long after the Arab conquest. This deity was a protector, a guide, ...

Gurzil Dispels the Darkness

Gurzil Dispels the Darkness (Libya)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of African Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

...Dispels the Darkness (Libya) Gurzil, the sun god, was worshiped among the Huwwara of Tripolitania well into the eleventh century, long after the Arab conquest. This deity was a protector, a guide, and a dispeller of darkness. In his solar aspect, he was identified with the two-horned Carthaginian Baal Hammon. He was not a major deity of cultivation or fertility, but rather a god of prophecy, a seer whose associations were with the departed, and whose—at times—enthroned, faceless mass appeared to represent the image of the deceased in a seated posture,...

♂ Běi Dǎo

♂ Běi Dǎo (1949)   Reference library

Dian LI

Berkshire Dictionary of Chinese Biography (Volume 4)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...Bei Dao recalls, is an accident that happened to him. He would not have become a poet if not for his experience with bricks and cement. Young and restless, yet stuck in a back-breaking job that taxed his body and soul, Bei Dao found writing down lines of words a convenient way to dispel the feelings of boredom and despair. The lines of words accumulated to become poems, soon to be shared with a few poetry-loving friends from his high school days. The circle of friends grew and formed a sort of “underground poetry club” that included aspiring young poets such as...

Javanese Mythology

Javanese Mythology   Quick reference

A Dictionary of Asian Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

...feeds her family by magic, placing one grain of rice in the pot each day that produces more than ample food, but she does so only on the condition that her husband not look into the pot. Of course, when she is away one day he does look into the pot and the magic is immediately dispelled, making it necessary for the family to use rice supplies like everyone else. Disappointed in her husband, the bidadari finds her winged garment and flies off to the other...

Bunker Hill, Battle of

Bunker Hill, Battle of   Reference library

Donald R. Lennon

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Military and Diplomatic History

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2013

...Hill, Battle of The battle of Bunker Hill, fought on 17 June 1775 , helped to dispel the British view that rebellious American colonists would flee when faced with British army professionals. After the engagements at Lexington and Concord, volunteer forces assembled around Boston, headquarters of the British army. Fearing that the British would fortify strategic locations adjoining the city, Boston's Committee of Safety on 16 June ordered New England troops into the Charlestown peninsula north of Boston, to fortify Bunker Hill. This promontory,...

Horus's Struggle with Set

Horus's Struggle with Set (Egypt)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of African Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

...of the forms of Horus, representing as he does that form of Heru-Behutet that prevailed in the southern heavens at midday, typifying the greatest power of the heat of the sun. It was under this form that Horus waged war against Set (Typhon). Heru-Behutet is the power that dispels darkness and night, drives away clouds, rain, and storms, and fills heaven and the world with his brilliance and light. He created himself, renews his birth daily, year by year performs his course in the heavens, bringing in his train the seasons and their proper produce. He is...

Pygmy

Pygmy   Reference library

Encyclopedia of Africa

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

...were widely held to be a myth. Illustrations and descriptions of pygmies depicted them as winged semihuman creatures who lived in treetops, hung from tails, and could make themselves invisible. European contact with pygmies in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries did little to dispel these myths. In the seventeenth century, English anatomist Edward Tyson published his treatise “The Anatomy of the Pygmie Compared with that of a Monkey, an Ape, and a Man,” in which he claimed to scientifically prove, through a comparison of skeletons, that pygmies were actually...

Summer Palace of Yiheyuan

Summer Palace of Yiheyuan   Reference library

TzeHuey CHIOU-PENG

Berkshire Encyclopedia of China

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

...up from the lakefront is the Longevity Hill (60 meters high), on which buildings cluster amidst a landscape designed with distinct features characteristic of Chinese classical gardens. Along a north-south axial line on the hill is the courtyard of a ceremonial hall (Cloud Dispelling Hall), followed by an imposing octagonal tower (Pavilion of Buddhist Incense) on a high platform, and a temple (Sea of Wisdom) wrapped in glazed ceramic tiles and miniature Buddhist images at the summit. Beyond these glittering architectural structures down the northern slope...

Mithra

Mithra (West Asia)   Quick reference

A Dictionary of World Mythology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003

... West Asia Of all the celestial beings ruling over the earth he was the most popular with the Persians, who represented him as the son of Ahura Mazdah. He was the light that preceded the sun when it rose, the one who dispelled darkness; and from his penetrating gaze could nothing be hidden. Mithra was aware of every happening, no matter how insignificant each might appear. In pre-Zoroastrian times Mithra and Ahura were most likely twin sky gods, looked upon as payu-thworeshtara , ‘the two creator-preservers’ of the cosmic order. Later theological...

Annales Gandenses

Annales Gandenses   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Medieval Warfare and Military Technology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

...for the Flemings. Yet he did not absolve his fellow citizens of their excesses as they eagerly mopped up the battlefield at Courtrai by killing all the French they could, regardless of social status. As the annalist records, the massive defeat of French arms at Courtrai did not dispel King Philip IV’s ire against the region. In spite of the French loss in 1302 , Philip moved against Flanders in 1304 . The annalist again provides crucial details but a skewed conclusion for the resulting battle at Mons-en-Pèvéle; all the contemporary sources and modern...

Assassins

Assassins   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Medieval Warfare and Military Technology

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010

...as a common noun meaning a professional murderer. The etymology of the name “Assassins” was eventually correctly explained by the orientalists of the nineteenth century. Modern scholarship in Ismaili studies, based on authentic Ismaili sources, has now begun to deconstruct and dispel the medieval legends surrounding the Nizaris. It has also shown that the name “Assassins” is a misnomer rooted in a pejorative appellation and lacking basis in any communal or organized use of hashish by the Nizari Ismailis, who were deeply devoted to their community. [ See also ...

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