Loading ...

You are looking at 1-10 of 10 entries  for:

All : dispel x
  • Usage and Grammar Guides x
Clear All

View:

Overview

Gurzil Dispels the Darkness

Subject: Religion

(Libya) Gurzil, the sun god, was worshiped among the Huwwara of Tripolitania well into the eleventh century, long after the Arab conquest. This deity was a protector, a guide, ...

dispel

dispel   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

... . So spelled—not ✳dispell . Cf. excel , expel & extol . Current ratio:...

dispel

dispel   Quick reference

Fowler’s Concise Dictionary of Modern English Usage (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

... means ‘to drive away in different directions, to disperse’, and is used literally with reference to fog, mist, clouds, and so on and (more commonly) with generalized abstract nouns ( dispel fear / dispel myths / dispel notions / dispel suspicions ). It is less idiomatic to use dispel with a singular countable entity that cannot be regarded as divisible, such as an accusation or rumour; in these cases alternatives such as rebut , refute , etc. are often...

dispel

dispel   Reference library

Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015

...dispel means to drive away in different directions, to disperse, and is used literally ( dispel clouds, fog , etc.) and with generalized abstract nouns ( dispel fear, notions, suspicions , etc.). It is not idiomatically used with an indivisible entity as object ( dispel an accusation, a rumour , etc.); other verbs ( rebut, refute , etc.) are available for such...

excel

excel   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

.... So spelled—not ✳excell . Cf. dispel , expel & extol . Current ratio:...

expel

expel   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016

.... So spelled—not ✳expell . Cf. dispel , excel & extol . Current ratio:...

predominant

predominant adj.   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
177 words

.... In good usage, predominate is the verb, predominant the adjective. Readers may be confused by predominate as an adjective because it is the same form as the verb, so predominant should be reserved for this job—e.g.: • “Jazz must still undergo [de-ghettoizing] to dispel the predominate [read predominant ] images of it as banal happy-time entertainment and primitive, spontaneous emotionalism.” Peter Watrous , “Finally, a Lincoln Center for American Music,” N.Y. Times , 20 Jan. 1991 , § 2, at 28. • “In Pittsburgh, our predominate [read ...

extol

extol   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
251 words

...is so spelled—e.g.: “Now [Justin] Raimondo runs a Web site called antiwar.com, in which he extols the good old days of the America First Movement.” Ronald Radosh , “The Red and the Brown,” Boston Globe , 13 Oct. 2002 , at D1. The word is sometimes misspelled ✳extoll . Cf. dispel , excel & expel . Occasionally the word is misused as if to mean “condemn highly”—e.g.: • “Unfortunately, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is publishing a new book in December, Guide to Your Child's Sleep , that extols [read warns about ] the dangers of the family...

not

not   Reference library

Garner’s Modern English Usage (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2016
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
470 words

...construction should usually (when short phrases or clauses are involved) be not . . . or . E.g.: • “As parents, we need to encourage our children to focus on our inner character, not on our superficial traits, nor on marketing-driven peer expectations.” Ellen J. Dewey , “Dispelling a Myth,” Lancaster New Era , 17 Aug. 1997 , at P3. (A possible revision: As parents, we need to encourage our children to focus on our inner character, not on our superficial traits or on marketing-driven peer expectations .) • “The Ramona trial . . . did not reunite the...

charisma

charisma   Quick reference

Fowler’s Concise Dictionary of Modern English Usage (3 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2015
Subject:
Language reference, Usage and Grammar Guides
Length:
211 words

...political figures, including J. F. Kennedy , Mikhail Gorbachev , and Nelson Mandela , and is now used as a synonym for ‘influence’ or ‘authority’ or even ‘attraction’ or ‘charm’ in various contexts, impersonal as well as personal: Spacecraft sent there in recent years have dispelled legends and added reams of sound, ordered data, yet the charisma of Mars remains — San Francisco Examiner , 1976 She presents well, has charm, charisma and vitality, but comes across as severely intellectual — Business , 1991 . 2 The adjective charismatic , in addition to...

predominate

predominate adj.   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of American Usage and Style

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

..., is a needless variant for predominant . In good usage, predominate is the verb, predominant the adjective. Because readers may be confused by predominate as an adjective, predominant should be reserved for this job—e.g.: “[J]azz must still undergo [de-ghettoizing] to dispel the predominate [read predominant ] images of it as banal happy-time entertainment and primitive, spontaneous emotionalism” ( N.Y. Times ). Cf. preponderant...

View: